Longitudinal changes in scores on the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) in pre-school children with autism: Implications for diagnostic classification and symptom stability

Gnakub Norbert Soke, Amy Philofsky, Carolyn Diguiseppi, Dennis Lezotte, Sally J Rogers, Susan Hepburn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

We prospectively examined mean changes in Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) Total and Domains scores and stability of the ADI-R diagnostic classification in 28 children with autism initially assessed at age 2-4 years and reassessed 2 years later. Mean Total, Social Interaction, and Communication scores decreased significantly from Time 1 to Time 2 Restricted/repetitive Domain mean scores did not change over time. The ADI-R diagnostic classification was stable in 67% of children using the current published criteria. The stability increased to 78% when a modified criterion was used in the Restricted/repetitive Domain and to 88% when the broader ASD criteria were used. Among pre-schoolers with autism, parent-reported symptoms decreased significantly at two-year follow-up in Social and Communication Domains but not in the Restricted/repetitive Domain. However, ADI-R diagnostic classification remained relatively stable over time. Revising ADI-R diagnostic criteria in the Restricted/repetitive Domain or including the broader ASD criteria may improve its sensitivity and diagnostic stability in younger children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)545-562
Number of pages18
JournalAutism
Volume15
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2011

Keywords

  • assessment
  • autism
  • Autism Diagnostic Interview- Revised
  • diagnostic classification
  • stability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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