Longitudinal biological exposure to carotenoids is associated with breast cancer-free survival in the women's healthy eating and living study

Cheryl L. Rock, Loki Natarajan, Minya Pu, Cynthia A. Thomson, Shirley W. Flatt, Bette J. Caan, Ellen B Gold, Wael K. Al-Delaimy, Vicky A. Newman, Richard A. Hajek, Marcia L. Stefanick, John P. Pierce

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In some cohort studies, a high-vegetable diet has been associated with greater likelihood of recurrence-free survival in women diagnosed with breast cancer. Caro-tenoids are obtained primarily from vegetables and fruit and they exhibit biological activities that may specifically reduce the progression of mammary carci-nogenesis. The present analysis examines the relationship between plasma carotenoids at enrollment and 1, 2 or 3, 4, and 6 years and breast cancer-free survival in the Women's Healthy Eating and Living Study participants (N = 3,043), who had been diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer. The primary end point was time to a second breast cancer event (a recurrence or new primary breast cancer). An average carotenoid concentration over time was estimated for each participant as the average area under the plasma carotenoid curve formed by the plasma carotenoid concentrations at scheduled clinic visits. Multiple regression Cox proportional hazards analysis with adjustment for prognostic and other factors was used to examine the association between carotenoids and breast cancer-free survival. A total of 508 (16.7%) breast cancer events occurred over a median 7.12 years follow-up. Compared with the lowest tertile, the hazard ratio for the medium/high plasma carotenoid tertiles was 0.67 (95% confidence interval, 0.54-0.83) after adjustment. The interaction between the study group and tertile of average carotenoid concentration over time was not significant (P = 0.23). Higher biological exposure to carotenoids, when assessed over the time frame of the study, was associated with greater likelihood of breast cancer-free survival regardless of study group assignment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)486-494
Number of pages9
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2009

Fingerprint

Carotenoids
Breast Neoplasms
Survival
Vegetables
Social Adjustment
Recurrence
Second Primary Neoplasms
Healthy Diet
Ambulatory Care
Fruit
Breast
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Diet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Longitudinal biological exposure to carotenoids is associated with breast cancer-free survival in the women's healthy eating and living study. / Rock, Cheryl L.; Natarajan, Loki; Pu, Minya; Thomson, Cynthia A.; Flatt, Shirley W.; Caan, Bette J.; Gold, Ellen B; Al-Delaimy, Wael K.; Newman, Vicky A.; Hajek, Richard A.; Stefanick, Marcia L.; Pierce, John P.

In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol. 18, No. 2, 02.2009, p. 486-494.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rock, CL, Natarajan, L, Pu, M, Thomson, CA, Flatt, SW, Caan, BJ, Gold, EB, Al-Delaimy, WK, Newman, VA, Hajek, RA, Stefanick, ML & Pierce, JP 2009, 'Longitudinal biological exposure to carotenoids is associated with breast cancer-free survival in the women's healthy eating and living study', Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 486-494. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-08-0809
Rock, Cheryl L. ; Natarajan, Loki ; Pu, Minya ; Thomson, Cynthia A. ; Flatt, Shirley W. ; Caan, Bette J. ; Gold, Ellen B ; Al-Delaimy, Wael K. ; Newman, Vicky A. ; Hajek, Richard A. ; Stefanick, Marcia L. ; Pierce, John P. / Longitudinal biological exposure to carotenoids is associated with breast cancer-free survival in the women's healthy eating and living study. In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. 2009 ; Vol. 18, No. 2. pp. 486-494.
@article{8278b64153874151849e2283d5b3af14,
title = "Longitudinal biological exposure to carotenoids is associated with breast cancer-free survival in the women's healthy eating and living study",
abstract = "In some cohort studies, a high-vegetable diet has been associated with greater likelihood of recurrence-free survival in women diagnosed with breast cancer. Caro-tenoids are obtained primarily from vegetables and fruit and they exhibit biological activities that may specifically reduce the progression of mammary carci-nogenesis. The present analysis examines the relationship between plasma carotenoids at enrollment and 1, 2 or 3, 4, and 6 years and breast cancer-free survival in the Women's Healthy Eating and Living Study participants (N = 3,043), who had been diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer. The primary end point was time to a second breast cancer event (a recurrence or new primary breast cancer). An average carotenoid concentration over time was estimated for each participant as the average area under the plasma carotenoid curve formed by the plasma carotenoid concentrations at scheduled clinic visits. Multiple regression Cox proportional hazards analysis with adjustment for prognostic and other factors was used to examine the association between carotenoids and breast cancer-free survival. A total of 508 (16.7{\%}) breast cancer events occurred over a median 7.12 years follow-up. Compared with the lowest tertile, the hazard ratio for the medium/high plasma carotenoid tertiles was 0.67 (95{\%} confidence interval, 0.54-0.83) after adjustment. The interaction between the study group and tertile of average carotenoid concentration over time was not significant (P = 0.23). Higher biological exposure to carotenoids, when assessed over the time frame of the study, was associated with greater likelihood of breast cancer-free survival regardless of study group assignment.",
author = "Rock, {Cheryl L.} and Loki Natarajan and Minya Pu and Thomson, {Cynthia A.} and Flatt, {Shirley W.} and Caan, {Bette J.} and Gold, {Ellen B} and Al-Delaimy, {Wael K.} and Newman, {Vicky A.} and Hajek, {Richard A.} and Stefanick, {Marcia L.} and Pierce, {John P.}",
year = "2009",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-08-0809",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "18",
pages = "486--494",
journal = "Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention",
issn = "1055-9965",
publisher = "American Association for Cancer Research Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Longitudinal biological exposure to carotenoids is associated with breast cancer-free survival in the women's healthy eating and living study

AU - Rock, Cheryl L.

AU - Natarajan, Loki

AU - Pu, Minya

AU - Thomson, Cynthia A.

AU - Flatt, Shirley W.

AU - Caan, Bette J.

AU - Gold, Ellen B

AU - Al-Delaimy, Wael K.

AU - Newman, Vicky A.

AU - Hajek, Richard A.

AU - Stefanick, Marcia L.

AU - Pierce, John P.

PY - 2009/2

Y1 - 2009/2

N2 - In some cohort studies, a high-vegetable diet has been associated with greater likelihood of recurrence-free survival in women diagnosed with breast cancer. Caro-tenoids are obtained primarily from vegetables and fruit and they exhibit biological activities that may specifically reduce the progression of mammary carci-nogenesis. The present analysis examines the relationship between plasma carotenoids at enrollment and 1, 2 or 3, 4, and 6 years and breast cancer-free survival in the Women's Healthy Eating and Living Study participants (N = 3,043), who had been diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer. The primary end point was time to a second breast cancer event (a recurrence or new primary breast cancer). An average carotenoid concentration over time was estimated for each participant as the average area under the plasma carotenoid curve formed by the plasma carotenoid concentrations at scheduled clinic visits. Multiple regression Cox proportional hazards analysis with adjustment for prognostic and other factors was used to examine the association between carotenoids and breast cancer-free survival. A total of 508 (16.7%) breast cancer events occurred over a median 7.12 years follow-up. Compared with the lowest tertile, the hazard ratio for the medium/high plasma carotenoid tertiles was 0.67 (95% confidence interval, 0.54-0.83) after adjustment. The interaction between the study group and tertile of average carotenoid concentration over time was not significant (P = 0.23). Higher biological exposure to carotenoids, when assessed over the time frame of the study, was associated with greater likelihood of breast cancer-free survival regardless of study group assignment.

AB - In some cohort studies, a high-vegetable diet has been associated with greater likelihood of recurrence-free survival in women diagnosed with breast cancer. Caro-tenoids are obtained primarily from vegetables and fruit and they exhibit biological activities that may specifically reduce the progression of mammary carci-nogenesis. The present analysis examines the relationship between plasma carotenoids at enrollment and 1, 2 or 3, 4, and 6 years and breast cancer-free survival in the Women's Healthy Eating and Living Study participants (N = 3,043), who had been diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer. The primary end point was time to a second breast cancer event (a recurrence or new primary breast cancer). An average carotenoid concentration over time was estimated for each participant as the average area under the plasma carotenoid curve formed by the plasma carotenoid concentrations at scheduled clinic visits. Multiple regression Cox proportional hazards analysis with adjustment for prognostic and other factors was used to examine the association between carotenoids and breast cancer-free survival. A total of 508 (16.7%) breast cancer events occurred over a median 7.12 years follow-up. Compared with the lowest tertile, the hazard ratio for the medium/high plasma carotenoid tertiles was 0.67 (95% confidence interval, 0.54-0.83) after adjustment. The interaction between the study group and tertile of average carotenoid concentration over time was not significant (P = 0.23). Higher biological exposure to carotenoids, when assessed over the time frame of the study, was associated with greater likelihood of breast cancer-free survival regardless of study group assignment.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=60549083101&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=60549083101&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-08-0809

DO - 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-08-0809

M3 - Article

C2 - 19190138

AN - SCOPUS:60549083101

VL - 18

SP - 486

EP - 494

JO - Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention

JF - Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention

SN - 1055-9965

IS - 2

ER -