Long-term survival with stereotactic radiotherapy for imaging-diagnosed pituitary tumors in dogs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Published studies on the use of stereotactic radiotherapy for dogs with pituitary tumors are limited. This retrospective observational study describes results of stereotactic radiotherapy for 45 dogs with imaging-diagnosed pituitary tumors. All dogs were treated at a single hospital during the period of December 2009–2015. The stereotactic radiotherapy was delivered in one 15 Gray (Gy) fraction or in three 8 Gy fractions. At the time of analysis, 41 dogs were deceased. Four were alive and censored from all survival analyses; one dog received 8 Gy every other day and was removed from protocol analyses. The median overall survival from first treatment was 311 days (95% confidence interval 226–410 days [range 1–2134 days]). Thirty-two dogs received 15 Gy (median overall survival 311 days; 95% confidence interval [range 221–427 days]), and 12 received 24 Gy on three consecutive days (median overall survival 245 days, 95% confidence interval [range 2–626 days]). Twenty-nine dogs had hyperadrenocorticism (median overall survival 245 days), while 16 had nonfunctional masses (median overall survival 626 days). Clinical improvement was reported in 37/45 cases. Presumptive signs of acute adverse effects within 4 months of stereotactic radiotherapy were noted in 10/45, and most had improvement spontaneously or with steroids. Late effects versus tumor progression were not discernable, but posttreatment blindness (2), hypernatremia (2), and progressive neurological signs (31) were reported. There was no statistical difference in median overall survival for different protocols. Patients with nonfunctional masses had longer median overall survival than those with hyperadrenocorticism (P = 0.0003). Survival outcomes with stereotactic radiotherapy were shorter than those previously reported with definitive radiation, especially for dogs with hyperadrenocorticism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalVeterinary Radiology and Ultrasound
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Pituitary Neoplasms
radiotherapy
Radiotherapy
image analysis
Dogs
neoplasms
Survival
dogs
Adrenocortical Hyperfunction
hyperadrenocorticism
confidence interval
Confidence Intervals
Hypernatremia
blindness
observational studies
Blindness
Survival Analysis
steroids
Observational Studies
adverse effects

Keywords

  • Cushing's disease
  • hyperadrenocorticism
  • photon therapy
  • SRS
  • stereotaxis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

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title = "Long-term survival with stereotactic radiotherapy for imaging-diagnosed pituitary tumors in dogs",
abstract = "Published studies on the use of stereotactic radiotherapy for dogs with pituitary tumors are limited. This retrospective observational study describes results of stereotactic radiotherapy for 45 dogs with imaging-diagnosed pituitary tumors. All dogs were treated at a single hospital during the period of December 2009–2015. The stereotactic radiotherapy was delivered in one 15 Gray (Gy) fraction or in three 8 Gy fractions. At the time of analysis, 41 dogs were deceased. Four were alive and censored from all survival analyses; one dog received 8 Gy every other day and was removed from protocol analyses. The median overall survival from first treatment was 311 days (95{\%} confidence interval 226–410 days [range 1–2134 days]). Thirty-two dogs received 15 Gy (median overall survival 311 days; 95{\%} confidence interval [range 221–427 days]), and 12 received 24 Gy on three consecutive days (median overall survival 245 days, 95{\%} confidence interval [range 2–626 days]). Twenty-nine dogs had hyperadrenocorticism (median overall survival 245 days), while 16 had nonfunctional masses (median overall survival 626 days). Clinical improvement was reported in 37/45 cases. Presumptive signs of acute adverse effects within 4 months of stereotactic radiotherapy were noted in 10/45, and most had improvement spontaneously or with steroids. Late effects versus tumor progression were not discernable, but posttreatment blindness (2), hypernatremia (2), and progressive neurological signs (31) were reported. There was no statistical difference in median overall survival for different protocols. Patients with nonfunctional masses had longer median overall survival than those with hyperadrenocorticism (P = 0.0003). Survival outcomes with stereotactic radiotherapy were shorter than those previously reported with definitive radiation, especially for dogs with hyperadrenocorticism.",
keywords = "Cushing's disease, hyperadrenocorticism, photon therapy, SRS, stereotaxis",
author = "Hansen, {Katherine S} and Allison Zwingenberger and Theon, {Alain P} and Kent, {Michael S}",
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N2 - Published studies on the use of stereotactic radiotherapy for dogs with pituitary tumors are limited. This retrospective observational study describes results of stereotactic radiotherapy for 45 dogs with imaging-diagnosed pituitary tumors. All dogs were treated at a single hospital during the period of December 2009–2015. The stereotactic radiotherapy was delivered in one 15 Gray (Gy) fraction or in three 8 Gy fractions. At the time of analysis, 41 dogs were deceased. Four were alive and censored from all survival analyses; one dog received 8 Gy every other day and was removed from protocol analyses. The median overall survival from first treatment was 311 days (95% confidence interval 226–410 days [range 1–2134 days]). Thirty-two dogs received 15 Gy (median overall survival 311 days; 95% confidence interval [range 221–427 days]), and 12 received 24 Gy on three consecutive days (median overall survival 245 days, 95% confidence interval [range 2–626 days]). Twenty-nine dogs had hyperadrenocorticism (median overall survival 245 days), while 16 had nonfunctional masses (median overall survival 626 days). Clinical improvement was reported in 37/45 cases. Presumptive signs of acute adverse effects within 4 months of stereotactic radiotherapy were noted in 10/45, and most had improvement spontaneously or with steroids. Late effects versus tumor progression were not discernable, but posttreatment blindness (2), hypernatremia (2), and progressive neurological signs (31) were reported. There was no statistical difference in median overall survival for different protocols. Patients with nonfunctional masses had longer median overall survival than those with hyperadrenocorticism (P = 0.0003). Survival outcomes with stereotactic radiotherapy were shorter than those previously reported with definitive radiation, especially for dogs with hyperadrenocorticism.

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