Long-term retention of older adults in the cardiovascular health study: Implications for studies of the oldest old

Elsa S. Strotmeyer, Alice M. Arnold, Robert M. Boudreau, Diane G. Ives, Mary Cushman, John A Robbins, Tamara B. Harris, Anne B. Newman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To describe retention according to age and visit type (clinic, home, telephone) and to determine characteristics associated with visit types for a longitudinal epidemiological study in older adults. DESIGN: Longitudinal cohort study. SETTING: Four U.S. clinical sites. PARTICIPANTS: Five thousand eight hundred eighty-eight Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS) participants aged 65 to 100 at 1989/90 or 1992/93 enrollment (58.6% female; 15.7% black). CHS participants were contacted every 6 months, with annual assessments through 1999 and in 2005/06 for the All Stars Study visit of the CHS cohort (aged 77-102; 66.5% female; 16.6% black). MEASUREMENTS: All annual contacts through 1999 (n=43,772) and for the 2005/06 visit (n=1,942). RESULTS: CHS had 43,772 total participant contacts from 1989 to 1999: 34,582 clinic visits (79.0%), 2,238 refusals (5.1%), 4,401 telephone visits (10.1%), 1,811 home visits (4.1%), and 740 other types (1.7%). In 2005/06, the All Stars participants of the CHS cohort had 36.6% clinic, 22.3% home, and 41.1% telephone visits. Compared with participants aged 65 to 69, odds ratios of not attending a CHS clinic visit were 1.82 (95% confidence interval (CI)=1.54-2.13), 2.94 (95% CI=2.45-3.57), 4.55 (95% CI=3.70-5.56), and 9.09 (95% CI=7.69-11.11) for those aged 70 to 74, 75 to 79, 80 to 84, and 85 and older, respectively, in sex-adjusted regression. In multivariable regression, participants with a 2005/06 clinic visit were younger, more likely to be male and in good health, and had had better cognitive and physical function 7 years earlier than participants with other visit types. Participants with home, telephone, and missing visits were similar on characteristics measured 7 years earlier. CONCLUSION: Offering home, telephone, and proxy visits are essential to optimizing follow-up of aging cohorts. Home visits increased in-person retention from 36.5% to 58.8% and diversified the cohort with respect to age, health, and physical functioning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)696-701
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume58
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2010

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Telephone
Health
Ambulatory Care
House Calls
Confidence Intervals
Cohort Studies
Longitudinal Studies
Proxy
Cognition
Epidemiologic Studies
Odds Ratio

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Epidemiology
  • Longitudinal cohort
  • Retention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Long-term retention of older adults in the cardiovascular health study : Implications for studies of the oldest old. / Strotmeyer, Elsa S.; Arnold, Alice M.; Boudreau, Robert M.; Ives, Diane G.; Cushman, Mary; Robbins, John A; Harris, Tamara B.; Newman, Anne B.

In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Vol. 58, No. 4, 04.2010, p. 696-701.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Strotmeyer, Elsa S. ; Arnold, Alice M. ; Boudreau, Robert M. ; Ives, Diane G. ; Cushman, Mary ; Robbins, John A ; Harris, Tamara B. ; Newman, Anne B. / Long-term retention of older adults in the cardiovascular health study : Implications for studies of the oldest old. In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. 2010 ; Vol. 58, No. 4. pp. 696-701.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVES: To describe retention according to age and visit type (clinic, home, telephone) and to determine characteristics associated with visit types for a longitudinal epidemiological study in older adults. DESIGN: Longitudinal cohort study. SETTING: Four U.S. clinical sites. PARTICIPANTS: Five thousand eight hundred eighty-eight Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS) participants aged 65 to 100 at 1989/90 or 1992/93 enrollment (58.6{\%} female; 15.7{\%} black). CHS participants were contacted every 6 months, with annual assessments through 1999 and in 2005/06 for the All Stars Study visit of the CHS cohort (aged 77-102; 66.5{\%} female; 16.6{\%} black). MEASUREMENTS: All annual contacts through 1999 (n=43,772) and for the 2005/06 visit (n=1,942). RESULTS: CHS had 43,772 total participant contacts from 1989 to 1999: 34,582 clinic visits (79.0{\%}), 2,238 refusals (5.1{\%}), 4,401 telephone visits (10.1{\%}), 1,811 home visits (4.1{\%}), and 740 other types (1.7{\%}). In 2005/06, the All Stars participants of the CHS cohort had 36.6{\%} clinic, 22.3{\%} home, and 41.1{\%} telephone visits. Compared with participants aged 65 to 69, odds ratios of not attending a CHS clinic visit were 1.82 (95{\%} confidence interval (CI)=1.54-2.13), 2.94 (95{\%} CI=2.45-3.57), 4.55 (95{\%} CI=3.70-5.56), and 9.09 (95{\%} CI=7.69-11.11) for those aged 70 to 74, 75 to 79, 80 to 84, and 85 and older, respectively, in sex-adjusted regression. In multivariable regression, participants with a 2005/06 clinic visit were younger, more likely to be male and in good health, and had had better cognitive and physical function 7 years earlier than participants with other visit types. Participants with home, telephone, and missing visits were similar on characteristics measured 7 years earlier. CONCLUSION: Offering home, telephone, and proxy visits are essential to optimizing follow-up of aging cohorts. Home visits increased in-person retention from 36.5{\%} to 58.8{\%} and diversified the cohort with respect to age, health, and physical functioning.",
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T2 - Implications for studies of the oldest old

AU - Strotmeyer, Elsa S.

AU - Arnold, Alice M.

AU - Boudreau, Robert M.

AU - Ives, Diane G.

AU - Cushman, Mary

AU - Robbins, John A

AU - Harris, Tamara B.

AU - Newman, Anne B.

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N2 - OBJECTIVES: To describe retention according to age and visit type (clinic, home, telephone) and to determine characteristics associated with visit types for a longitudinal epidemiological study in older adults. DESIGN: Longitudinal cohort study. SETTING: Four U.S. clinical sites. PARTICIPANTS: Five thousand eight hundred eighty-eight Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS) participants aged 65 to 100 at 1989/90 or 1992/93 enrollment (58.6% female; 15.7% black). CHS participants were contacted every 6 months, with annual assessments through 1999 and in 2005/06 for the All Stars Study visit of the CHS cohort (aged 77-102; 66.5% female; 16.6% black). MEASUREMENTS: All annual contacts through 1999 (n=43,772) and for the 2005/06 visit (n=1,942). RESULTS: CHS had 43,772 total participant contacts from 1989 to 1999: 34,582 clinic visits (79.0%), 2,238 refusals (5.1%), 4,401 telephone visits (10.1%), 1,811 home visits (4.1%), and 740 other types (1.7%). In 2005/06, the All Stars participants of the CHS cohort had 36.6% clinic, 22.3% home, and 41.1% telephone visits. Compared with participants aged 65 to 69, odds ratios of not attending a CHS clinic visit were 1.82 (95% confidence interval (CI)=1.54-2.13), 2.94 (95% CI=2.45-3.57), 4.55 (95% CI=3.70-5.56), and 9.09 (95% CI=7.69-11.11) for those aged 70 to 74, 75 to 79, 80 to 84, and 85 and older, respectively, in sex-adjusted regression. In multivariable regression, participants with a 2005/06 clinic visit were younger, more likely to be male and in good health, and had had better cognitive and physical function 7 years earlier than participants with other visit types. Participants with home, telephone, and missing visits were similar on characteristics measured 7 years earlier. CONCLUSION: Offering home, telephone, and proxy visits are essential to optimizing follow-up of aging cohorts. Home visits increased in-person retention from 36.5% to 58.8% and diversified the cohort with respect to age, health, and physical functioning.

AB - OBJECTIVES: To describe retention according to age and visit type (clinic, home, telephone) and to determine characteristics associated with visit types for a longitudinal epidemiological study in older adults. DESIGN: Longitudinal cohort study. SETTING: Four U.S. clinical sites. PARTICIPANTS: Five thousand eight hundred eighty-eight Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS) participants aged 65 to 100 at 1989/90 or 1992/93 enrollment (58.6% female; 15.7% black). CHS participants were contacted every 6 months, with annual assessments through 1999 and in 2005/06 for the All Stars Study visit of the CHS cohort (aged 77-102; 66.5% female; 16.6% black). MEASUREMENTS: All annual contacts through 1999 (n=43,772) and for the 2005/06 visit (n=1,942). RESULTS: CHS had 43,772 total participant contacts from 1989 to 1999: 34,582 clinic visits (79.0%), 2,238 refusals (5.1%), 4,401 telephone visits (10.1%), 1,811 home visits (4.1%), and 740 other types (1.7%). In 2005/06, the All Stars participants of the CHS cohort had 36.6% clinic, 22.3% home, and 41.1% telephone visits. Compared with participants aged 65 to 69, odds ratios of not attending a CHS clinic visit were 1.82 (95% confidence interval (CI)=1.54-2.13), 2.94 (95% CI=2.45-3.57), 4.55 (95% CI=3.70-5.56), and 9.09 (95% CI=7.69-11.11) for those aged 70 to 74, 75 to 79, 80 to 84, and 85 and older, respectively, in sex-adjusted regression. In multivariable regression, participants with a 2005/06 clinic visit were younger, more likely to be male and in good health, and had had better cognitive and physical function 7 years earlier than participants with other visit types. Participants with home, telephone, and missing visits were similar on characteristics measured 7 years earlier. CONCLUSION: Offering home, telephone, and proxy visits are essential to optimizing follow-up of aging cohorts. Home visits increased in-person retention from 36.5% to 58.8% and diversified the cohort with respect to age, health, and physical functioning.

KW - Aging

KW - Epidemiology

KW - Longitudinal cohort

KW - Retention

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