Long term ozone exposure alters the pattern of protein adduct formation by 1-nitronaphthalene metabolites in rat airway epithelium in vivo

Åsa M. Wheelock, Bridget C. Boland, Margret Isbell, Dexter Morin, Michael Shultz, Charles Plopper, Alan R Buckpitt

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Nitro-PAH are mainly found in diesel engine exhaust gas. However, nitro-PAH also formed from their parent PAH though atmospheric photochemical reactions and can, therefore, be a problem during the combustion of any fossil fuels. In vivo proteomic approaches was used to identify airway epithelial proteins which are adducted by 1-nitronaphthalenes (1-NN) metabolites and examined quantitatively how the adduction pattern is affected by prior ozone exposure in vivo of sufficient length to produce tolerance. A total of 14 different protein spots representing 8 different proteins were adducted by 1-NN metabolites. The majority of these proteins were members of various protein families involved in the cellular response to stress, such as heat shock proteins and molecular chaperons. The two most extensively adducted proteins, peroxiredoxin 6 and biliverdin reductase, were associated with the first-line antioxidant defense system of the cell. Oxidant exposure changed the pattern of adduct formation by 1-NN metabolites and that these changes correlated with increased toxicity observed in previous pathological studies. The results are an essential step towards elucidating the mechanism of toxicity for a common air pollutant, 1-NN, and its synergistic toxicological effect with ozone. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 229th ACS National Meeting (San Diego, CA 3/13-17/2005).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationACS, Division of Environmental Chemistry - Preprints of Extended Abstracts
Pages512-517
Number of pages6
Volume45
Edition1
StatePublished - 2005
EventACS, Division of Environmental Chemistry - Preprints of Extended Abstracts - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Mar 13 2005Mar 17 2005

Other

OtherACS, Division of Environmental Chemistry - Preprints of Extended Abstracts
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period3/13/053/17/05

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Energy(all)

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    Wheelock, Å. M., Boland, B. C., Isbell, M., Morin, D., Shultz, M., Plopper, C., & Buckpitt, A. R. (2005). Long term ozone exposure alters the pattern of protein adduct formation by 1-nitronaphthalene metabolites in rat airway epithelium in vivo. In ACS, Division of Environmental Chemistry - Preprints of Extended Abstracts (1 ed., Vol. 45, pp. 512-517)