Long-term, high-level hepatic secretion of acid α-glucosidase for Pompe disease achieved in non-human primates using helper-dependent adenovirus

D. P.W. Rastall, S. S. Seregin, Y. A. Aldhamen, L. M. Kaiser, C. Mullins, A. Liou, Frank Ing, C. Pereria-Hicks, S. Godbehere-Roosa, D. Palmer, P. Ng, A. Amalfitano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pompe disease (glycogen storage disease type II (GSD-II)) is a myopathy caused by a genetic deficiency of acid α-glucosidase (GAA) leading to lysosomal glycogen accumulation causing muscle weakness, respiratory insufficiency and death. We previously demonstrated in GSD-II mice that a single injection of a helper-dependent adenovirus (HD-Ad) expressing GAA resulted in at least 300 days of liver secretion of GAA, correction of the glycogen storage in cardiac and skeletal muscles and improved muscle strength. Recent reports suggest that gene therapy modeling for lysososomal storage diseases in mice fails to predict outcomes in larger animal models. We therefore evaluated an HD-Ad expressing GAA in non-human primates. The baboons not only tolerated the procedure well, but the results also confirmed that a single dose of the HD-Ad allowed the livers of the treated animals to express and secrete large amounts of GAA for at least 6 months, at levels similar to those achieved in mice. Moreover, we detected liver-derived GAA in the heart, diaphragm and skeletal muscles of the treated animals for the duration of the study at levels that corrected glycogen accumulation in mice. This work validates our proof-of-concept studies in mice, and justifies future efforts using Ad-based vectors in Pompe disease patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)743-752
Number of pages10
JournalGene Therapy
Volume23
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Glycogen Storage Disease Type II
Glucosidases
Adenoviridae
Primates
Acids
Glycogen
Liver
Myocardium
Skeletal Muscle
Papio
Muscle Weakness
Muscle Strength
Muscular Diseases
Diaphragm
Respiratory Insufficiency
Genetic Therapy
Animal Models
Injections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Rastall, D. P. W., Seregin, S. S., Aldhamen, Y. A., Kaiser, L. M., Mullins, C., Liou, A., ... Amalfitano, A. (2016). Long-term, high-level hepatic secretion of acid α-glucosidase for Pompe disease achieved in non-human primates using helper-dependent adenovirus. Gene Therapy, 23(10), 743-752. https://doi.org/10.1038/gt.2016.53

Long-term, high-level hepatic secretion of acid α-glucosidase for Pompe disease achieved in non-human primates using helper-dependent adenovirus. / Rastall, D. P.W.; Seregin, S. S.; Aldhamen, Y. A.; Kaiser, L. M.; Mullins, C.; Liou, A.; Ing, Frank; Pereria-Hicks, C.; Godbehere-Roosa, S.; Palmer, D.; Ng, P.; Amalfitano, A.

In: Gene Therapy, Vol. 23, No. 10, 01.10.2016, p. 743-752.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rastall, DPW, Seregin, SS, Aldhamen, YA, Kaiser, LM, Mullins, C, Liou, A, Ing, F, Pereria-Hicks, C, Godbehere-Roosa, S, Palmer, D, Ng, P & Amalfitano, A 2016, 'Long-term, high-level hepatic secretion of acid α-glucosidase for Pompe disease achieved in non-human primates using helper-dependent adenovirus', Gene Therapy, vol. 23, no. 10, pp. 743-752. https://doi.org/10.1038/gt.2016.53
Rastall, D. P.W. ; Seregin, S. S. ; Aldhamen, Y. A. ; Kaiser, L. M. ; Mullins, C. ; Liou, A. ; Ing, Frank ; Pereria-Hicks, C. ; Godbehere-Roosa, S. ; Palmer, D. ; Ng, P. ; Amalfitano, A. / Long-term, high-level hepatic secretion of acid α-glucosidase for Pompe disease achieved in non-human primates using helper-dependent adenovirus. In: Gene Therapy. 2016 ; Vol. 23, No. 10. pp. 743-752.
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