Long-term health effects of neutering dogs: Comparison of labrador retrievers with golden retrievers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Our recent study on the effects of neutering (including spaying) in Golden Retrievers in markedly increasing the incidence of two joint disorders and three cancers prompted this study and a comparison of Golden and Labrador Retrievers. Veterinary hospital records were examined over a 13-year period for the effects of neutering during specified age ranges: before 6 mo., and during 6-11 mo., year 1 or years 2 through 8. The joint disorders examined were hip dysplasia, cranial cruciate ligament tear and elbow dysplasia. The cancers examined were lymphosarcoma, hemangiosarcoma, mast cell tumor, and mammary cancer. The results for the Golden Retriever were similar to the previous study, but there were notable differences between breeds. In Labrador Retrievers, where about 5 percent of gonadally intact males and females had one or more joint disorders, neutering at <6 mo. doubled the incidence of one or more joint disorders in both sexes. In male and female Golden Retrievers, with the same 5 percent rate of joint disorders in intact dogs, neutering at <6 mo. increased the incidence of a joint disorder to 4-5 times that of intact dogs. The incidence of one or more cancers in female Labrador Retrievers increased slightly above the 3 percent level of intact females with neutering. In contrast, in female Golden Retrievers, with the same 3 percent rate of one or more cancers in intact females, neutering at all periods through 8 years of age increased the rate of at least one of the cancers by 3-4 times. In male Golden and Labrador Retrievers neutering had relatively minor effects in increasing the occurrence of cancers. Comparisons of cancers in the two breeds suggest that the occurrence of cancers in female Golden Retrievers is a reflection of particular vulnerability to gonadal hormone removal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere102241
JournalPLoS One
Volume9
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 14 2014

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Newfoundland and Labrador
Gonadal Hormones
Golden Retriever
Labrador Retriever
Ligaments
castration
Tumors
Health
Dogs
neoplasms
dogs
Joints
Neoplasms
incidence
Incidence
Animal Hospitals
Hemangiosarcoma
Hip Dislocation
breeds
hip dysplasia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Long-term health effects of neutering dogs : Comparison of labrador retrievers with golden retrievers. / Hart, Benjamin; Hart, Lynette A; Thigpen, Abigail; Willits, Neil H.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 9, No. 7, e102241, 14.07.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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