Long-term erythrocytapheresis is associated with reduced liver iron concentration in sickle cell disease

Scott N. Myers, Ryan Eid, John Myers, Salvatore Bertolone, Arun R Panigrahi, Jennifer Mullinax, Ashok B. Raj

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Erythrocytapheresis procedures are increasingly used in sickle cell disease. Serum ferritin and noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging measurements of liver iron concentration (LIC) are frequently used to monitor iron overload secondary to hypertransfusion. There is a paucity of data describing the impact of long-term erythrocytapheresis (LTE) on LIC. Materials and Methods: We measured magnetic resonance imaging liver and cardiac iron on LTE subjects and stratified them into 2 groups: higher LIC (>3 mg/g) and lower LIC (<3 mg/g). χ2 and t test were used to test for differences between the 2 groups. Logistic regression and generalized linear mixed-effects models were used to test what impacted LIC. Results: None of 29 sickle cell disease subjects maintained on LTE had high cardiac iron concentration. LIC was associated with serum ferritin (r=0.697, P<0.001) but was not associated with the total number of LTE procedures (r= -0.088, P=0.656) or total number of simple transfusions (r=0.316, P=0.108). The total number of LTE procedures was not associated with serum ferritin (r=0.040, P=0.838), the total number of simple transfusions (r= -0.258, P=0.184), or LIC group (r= -0.111, P=0.566). Conclusion: There was no significant correlation between duration of LTE maintenance and LIC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)22-26
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Erythrocytapheresis
  • Iron overload
  • Sickle cell disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Hematology
  • Oncology

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