Long-standing donor diabetes and pathologic findings are associated with shorter allograft survival in recipients of kidney transplants from diabetic donors

Aubre Gilbert, David Scott, Megan Stack, Angelo de Mattos, Doug Norman, Shehzad Rehman, Joseph Lockridge, David Woodland, Vanderlene Kung, Nicole K. Andeen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Approximately 6% of deceased kidney donors (DKDs) are diabetic; their kidneys may be associated with worse allograft survival, but published studies suggest that recipient diabetes status has a greater impact on mortality and survival. Since biopsy findings are the most common reason for organ discard, we sought to understand histologic and clinical factors that influence graft survival in patients who receive a kidney from a diabetic DKD. We retrospectively reviewed our institutional experience from 2005 to 2019, and re-evaluated pre-implantation and earliest post-transplant biopsies. Histologic findings were compared against a control cohort of non-diabetic DKD. Of 829 adult DKD transplants, 37 (4.5%) came from diabetic donors. There was no significant difference in diabetic vs. non-diabetic DKD graft survival for all-comers; however, when stratified by duration of donor diabetes, donor diabetes ≥6 years was associated with graft failure. In 25 patients with post-transplant biopsies available, diabetic DKD allografts had significantly greater non-glomerular chronic injury than non-diabetic DKD allografts. Moderate arteriolar hyalinosis (in 24%), moderate tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis (IFTA, in 36%), and diabetic glomerulopathy (in 24%) on early post-transplant biopsy were associated with allograft failure. Pre-implantation frozen section discrepancies were more common in long-standing donor diabetes, and arteriolar hyalinosis and IFTA scores on frozen accurately prognosticated graft loss. There was no morphologic improvement in lesions of diabetic nephropathy on short-term follow-up. In conclusion, donor diabetes ≥6 years, and histologic findings on frozen section and early post-transplant biopsy are associated with diabetic DKD allograft loss.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalModern Pathology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

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