Long- and short-term variability of automated perimetry results in patients with optic neuritis and healthy subjects

Michael Wall, Chris Ajohnson, Kim E. Kutzko, Richard Nguyen, Caridad Brito, John L Keltner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To measure the short- and long-term variability of automated perimetry in patients with optic neuritis and normal subjects. Design: Prospective case-control design of patients with recovered optic neuritis with intraday and interday repetitions to obtain robust variability measurements. Entry criteria included a corrected pattern SD that was worse than the normal 5% probability level and a mean deviation worse than -3 dB but better than -20 dB. Five Humphrey 30-2 full threshold tests were administered during a 7-hour period (1 test every 2 hours) on the same day and at the same periods on 5 separate days. Subjects: Seventeen patients with recovered optic neuritis and 10 healthy subjects of similar age. Main Outcome Measures: Short-term variability and long-term variability for global visual field data. Results: Patients with optic neuritis demonstrated variations in visual field sensitivity that were outside the entire range of variability for normal controls. These variations occurred for multiple tests performed on the same day at specific times and for tests performed at specific times on different days. There were no consistent patterns of sensitivity changes that could be attributed to time of day. The most dramatic fluctuations occurred in a patient whose visual fields varied from normal to a hemianopic defect from one week to another and from a partial quadrant loss to a hemianopic defect at different times on the same day. Seven of the patients with optic neuritis also demonstrated intermittent vertical step defects. Conclusions: Patients with resolved optic neuritis can have large variations in visual field results on different days and at different times on the same day. The variations affect both the severity and the pattern of visual field loss and do not appear to be consistent across patients. These data indicate that care must be taken when automated visual field results in patients with optic neuritis are interpreted. Distinguishing systematic changes in sensitivity from variability requires more than a comparison of the current visual field with the most recent previous visual field.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)53-61
Number of pages9
JournalArchives of Ophthalmology
Volume116
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Long- and short-term variability of automated perimetry results in patients with optic neuritis and healthy subjects'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this