Locating and targeting moving tumors with radiation beams

Sonja Dieterich, Kevin Cleary, Warren D'Souza, Martin Murphy, Kenneth H. Wong, Paul Keall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The current climate of rapid technological evolution is reflected in newer and better methods to modulate and direct radiation beams for cancer therapy. This Vision 2020 paper focuses on part of this evolution, locating and targeting moving tumors. The two processes are somewhat independent and in principle different implementations of the locating and targeting processes can be interchanged. Advanced localization and targeting methods have an impact on treatment planning and also present new challenges for quality assurance (QA), that of verifying real-time delivery. Some methods to locate and target moving tumors with radiation beams are currently FDA approved for clinical use-and this availability and implementation will increase with time. Extensions of current capabilities will be the integration of higher order dimensionality, such as rotation and deformation in addition to translation, into the estimate of the patient pose and real-time reoptimization and adaption of delivery to the dynamically changing anatomy of cancer patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5684-5694
Number of pages11
JournalMedical Physics
Volume35
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Radiation
Neoplasms
Climate
Anatomy
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Adaptive radiotherapy
  • Respiratory motion
  • Tracking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Dieterich, S., Cleary, K., D'Souza, W., Murphy, M., Wong, K. H., & Keall, P. (2008). Locating and targeting moving tumors with radiation beams. Medical Physics, 35(12), 5684-5694. https://doi.org/10.1118/1.3020593

Locating and targeting moving tumors with radiation beams. / Dieterich, Sonja; Cleary, Kevin; D'Souza, Warren; Murphy, Martin; Wong, Kenneth H.; Keall, Paul.

In: Medical Physics, Vol. 35, No. 12, 2008, p. 5684-5694.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dieterich, S, Cleary, K, D'Souza, W, Murphy, M, Wong, KH & Keall, P 2008, 'Locating and targeting moving tumors with radiation beams', Medical Physics, vol. 35, no. 12, pp. 5684-5694. https://doi.org/10.1118/1.3020593
Dieterich S, Cleary K, D'Souza W, Murphy M, Wong KH, Keall P. Locating and targeting moving tumors with radiation beams. Medical Physics. 2008;35(12):5684-5694. https://doi.org/10.1118/1.3020593
Dieterich, Sonja ; Cleary, Kevin ; D'Souza, Warren ; Murphy, Martin ; Wong, Kenneth H. ; Keall, Paul. / Locating and targeting moving tumors with radiation beams. In: Medical Physics. 2008 ; Vol. 35, No. 12. pp. 5684-5694.
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