Localization of voltage-gated ion channels in mammalian brain

James Trimmer, Kenneth J. Rhodes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

313 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The intrinsic electrical properties of neurons are shaped in large part by the action of voltage-gated ion channels. Molecular cloning studies have revealed a large family of ion channel genes, many of which are expressed in mammalian brain. Much recent effort has focused on determining the contribution of the protein products of these genes to neuronal function. This requires knowledge of the abundance and distribution of the constituent subunits of the channels in specific mammalian central neurons. Here we review progress made in recent studies aimed at localizing specific ion channel subunits using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. We then discuss the implications of these results in terms of neuronal physiology and neuronal mechanisms underlying the observed patterns of expression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)477-519
Number of pages43
JournalAnnual Review of Physiology
Volume66
DOIs
StatePublished - 2004

Fingerprint

Ion Channels
Brain
Neurons
Molecular Cloning
In Situ Hybridization
Immunohistochemistry
Genes
Proteins

Keywords

  • Cerebellum
  • Cortex
  • Excitability
  • Hippocampus
  • Neuron

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

Localization of voltage-gated ion channels in mammalian brain. / Trimmer, James; Rhodes, Kenneth J.

In: Annual Review of Physiology, Vol. 66, 2004, p. 477-519.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Trimmer, James ; Rhodes, Kenneth J. / Localization of voltage-gated ion channels in mammalian brain. In: Annual Review of Physiology. 2004 ; Vol. 66. pp. 477-519.
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