Local food environments are associated with girls' energy, sugar-sweetened beverage and snack-food intakes

Andrea L. Deierlein, Maida P. Galvez, Irene H. Yen, Susan M. Pinney, Frank M. Biro, Lawrence H. Kushi, Susan Teitelbaum, Mary S. Wolff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To describe availability and frequency of use of local snack-food outlets and determine whether reported use of these outlets was associated with dietary intakes. Design: Data were cross-sectional. Availability and frequency of use of three types of local snack-food outlets were reported. Daily dietary intakes were based on the average of up to four 24 h dietary recalls. Multivariable linear regression models estimated average daily intakes of energy, sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) and snack foods/sweets associated with use of outlets. Setting: Multi-site, observational cohort study in the USA, 2004-2006. Subjects: Girls aged 6-8 years (n 1010). Results: Weekly frequency of use of local snack-food outlets increased with number of available types of outlets. Girls with access to only one type of outlet reported consuming food/beverage items less frequently than girls with access to two or three types of outlets (P < 0·001). Girls' daily energy, SSB and snack foods/sweets intakes increased with greater use of outlets. Girls who reported using outlets > 1 to 3 times/week consumed 0·27 (95 % CI 0·13, 0·40) servings of SSB more daily than girls who reported no use. Girls who reported using outlets > 3 times/week consumed 449·61 (95 % CI 134·93, 764·29) kJ, 0·43 (95 % CI 0·29, 0·58) servings of SSB and 0·38 (95 % CI 0·12, 0·65) servings of snack foods/sweets more daily than those who reported no use. Conclusions: Girls' frequency of use of local snack-food outlets increases with the number of available types of outlets and is associated with greater daily intakes of energy and servings of SSB and snack foods/sweets.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2194-2200
Number of pages7
JournalPublic Health Nutrition
Volume17
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 30 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Snacks
Beverages
Eating
Food
Energy Intake
Linear Models
Food and Beverages
Observational Studies
Cohort Studies

Keywords

  • Children
  • Diet
  • Environment
  • Neighbourhood
  • Resources

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Deierlein, A. L., Galvez, M. P., Yen, I. H., Pinney, S. M., Biro, F. M., Kushi, L. H., ... Wolff, M. S. (2013). Local food environments are associated with girls' energy, sugar-sweetened beverage and snack-food intakes. Public Health Nutrition, 17(10), 2194-2200. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980014000639

Local food environments are associated with girls' energy, sugar-sweetened beverage and snack-food intakes. / Deierlein, Andrea L.; Galvez, Maida P.; Yen, Irene H.; Pinney, Susan M.; Biro, Frank M.; Kushi, Lawrence H.; Teitelbaum, Susan; Wolff, Mary S.

In: Public Health Nutrition, Vol. 17, No. 10, 30.08.2013, p. 2194-2200.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Deierlein, AL, Galvez, MP, Yen, IH, Pinney, SM, Biro, FM, Kushi, LH, Teitelbaum, S & Wolff, MS 2013, 'Local food environments are associated with girls' energy, sugar-sweetened beverage and snack-food intakes', Public Health Nutrition, vol. 17, no. 10, pp. 2194-2200. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980014000639
Deierlein, Andrea L. ; Galvez, Maida P. ; Yen, Irene H. ; Pinney, Susan M. ; Biro, Frank M. ; Kushi, Lawrence H. ; Teitelbaum, Susan ; Wolff, Mary S. / Local food environments are associated with girls' energy, sugar-sweetened beverage and snack-food intakes. In: Public Health Nutrition. 2013 ; Vol. 17, No. 10. pp. 2194-2200.
@article{1632bb6fa3b246379b6b02d3ea0825ef,
title = "Local food environments are associated with girls' energy, sugar-sweetened beverage and snack-food intakes",
abstract = "Objective: To describe availability and frequency of use of local snack-food outlets and determine whether reported use of these outlets was associated with dietary intakes. Design: Data were cross-sectional. Availability and frequency of use of three types of local snack-food outlets were reported. Daily dietary intakes were based on the average of up to four 24 h dietary recalls. Multivariable linear regression models estimated average daily intakes of energy, sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) and snack foods/sweets associated with use of outlets. Setting: Multi-site, observational cohort study in the USA, 2004-2006. Subjects: Girls aged 6-8 years (n 1010). Results: Weekly frequency of use of local snack-food outlets increased with number of available types of outlets. Girls with access to only one type of outlet reported consuming food/beverage items less frequently than girls with access to two or three types of outlets (P < 0·001). Girls' daily energy, SSB and snack foods/sweets intakes increased with greater use of outlets. Girls who reported using outlets > 1 to 3 times/week consumed 0·27 (95 {\%} CI 0·13, 0·40) servings of SSB more daily than girls who reported no use. Girls who reported using outlets > 3 times/week consumed 449·61 (95 {\%} CI 134·93, 764·29) kJ, 0·43 (95 {\%} CI 0·29, 0·58) servings of SSB and 0·38 (95 {\%} CI 0·12, 0·65) servings of snack foods/sweets more daily than those who reported no use. Conclusions: Girls' frequency of use of local snack-food outlets increases with the number of available types of outlets and is associated with greater daily intakes of energy and servings of SSB and snack foods/sweets.",
keywords = "Children, Diet, Environment, Neighbourhood, Resources",
author = "Deierlein, {Andrea L.} and Galvez, {Maida P.} and Yen, {Irene H.} and Pinney, {Susan M.} and Biro, {Frank M.} and Kushi, {Lawrence H.} and Susan Teitelbaum and Wolff, {Mary S.}",
year = "2013",
month = "8",
day = "30",
doi = "10.1017/S1368980014000639",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "17",
pages = "2194--2200",
journal = "Public Health Nutrition",
issn = "1368-9800",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Local food environments are associated with girls' energy, sugar-sweetened beverage and snack-food intakes

AU - Deierlein, Andrea L.

AU - Galvez, Maida P.

AU - Yen, Irene H.

AU - Pinney, Susan M.

AU - Biro, Frank M.

AU - Kushi, Lawrence H.

AU - Teitelbaum, Susan

AU - Wolff, Mary S.

PY - 2013/8/30

Y1 - 2013/8/30

N2 - Objective: To describe availability and frequency of use of local snack-food outlets and determine whether reported use of these outlets was associated with dietary intakes. Design: Data were cross-sectional. Availability and frequency of use of three types of local snack-food outlets were reported. Daily dietary intakes were based on the average of up to four 24 h dietary recalls. Multivariable linear regression models estimated average daily intakes of energy, sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) and snack foods/sweets associated with use of outlets. Setting: Multi-site, observational cohort study in the USA, 2004-2006. Subjects: Girls aged 6-8 years (n 1010). Results: Weekly frequency of use of local snack-food outlets increased with number of available types of outlets. Girls with access to only one type of outlet reported consuming food/beverage items less frequently than girls with access to two or three types of outlets (P < 0·001). Girls' daily energy, SSB and snack foods/sweets intakes increased with greater use of outlets. Girls who reported using outlets > 1 to 3 times/week consumed 0·27 (95 % CI 0·13, 0·40) servings of SSB more daily than girls who reported no use. Girls who reported using outlets > 3 times/week consumed 449·61 (95 % CI 134·93, 764·29) kJ, 0·43 (95 % CI 0·29, 0·58) servings of SSB and 0·38 (95 % CI 0·12, 0·65) servings of snack foods/sweets more daily than those who reported no use. Conclusions: Girls' frequency of use of local snack-food outlets increases with the number of available types of outlets and is associated with greater daily intakes of energy and servings of SSB and snack foods/sweets.

AB - Objective: To describe availability and frequency of use of local snack-food outlets and determine whether reported use of these outlets was associated with dietary intakes. Design: Data were cross-sectional. Availability and frequency of use of three types of local snack-food outlets were reported. Daily dietary intakes were based on the average of up to four 24 h dietary recalls. Multivariable linear regression models estimated average daily intakes of energy, sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) and snack foods/sweets associated with use of outlets. Setting: Multi-site, observational cohort study in the USA, 2004-2006. Subjects: Girls aged 6-8 years (n 1010). Results: Weekly frequency of use of local snack-food outlets increased with number of available types of outlets. Girls with access to only one type of outlet reported consuming food/beverage items less frequently than girls with access to two or three types of outlets (P < 0·001). Girls' daily energy, SSB and snack foods/sweets intakes increased with greater use of outlets. Girls who reported using outlets > 1 to 3 times/week consumed 0·27 (95 % CI 0·13, 0·40) servings of SSB more daily than girls who reported no use. Girls who reported using outlets > 3 times/week consumed 449·61 (95 % CI 134·93, 764·29) kJ, 0·43 (95 % CI 0·29, 0·58) servings of SSB and 0·38 (95 % CI 0·12, 0·65) servings of snack foods/sweets more daily than those who reported no use. Conclusions: Girls' frequency of use of local snack-food outlets increases with the number of available types of outlets and is associated with greater daily intakes of energy and servings of SSB and snack foods/sweets.

KW - Children

KW - Diet

KW - Environment

KW - Neighbourhood

KW - Resources

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84911371735&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84911371735&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S1368980014000639

DO - 10.1017/S1368980014000639

M3 - Article

C2 - 24821228

AN - SCOPUS:84911371735

VL - 17

SP - 2194

EP - 2200

JO - Public Health Nutrition

JF - Public Health Nutrition

SN - 1368-9800

IS - 10

ER -