Linking academic and clinical missions: UC Davis' integrated AHC

Claire Pomeroy, Ann Rice, William McGowan, Nathan Osburn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Academic health centers (AHCs) rely on cross-subsidization of education and research programs by the clinical enterprise, but this is becoming more challenging as clinical reimbursements decline. These new realities provide an important opportunity to reevaluate the relationships between medical schools and academic medical centers.The authors examine the benefits of their ongoing commitment to create a fully integrated AHC at the University of California (UC) Davis, discussing strategies that serve as catalysts for continued growth. They explore how investments of proceeds from the clinical enterprise directly enhance educational and research initiatives, which, in turn, increase the success of patient-care programs. This has created a cycle of excellence that leads to an enhanced reputation for the entire health system.One strategy involves using clinical margins to "prime the pump" in anticipation of major research initiatives, resulting in rapid increases in external research funding and academic recognition. In turn, this facilitates recruitment of high-quality faculty and staff, improving the ability to deliver expert clinical care. The overall enhanced institutional reputation positions both the clinical and academic programs for further success.The authors posit that such approaches require executive-level commitment to a single strategic vision, unified leadership, and collaborative financial and operational decision making. Adopting such changes is not without challenges, which are discussed, but the authors suggest that an integrated AHC fosters optimized operations, enhanced reputation, and stronger performance across all mission areas. They also provide examples of how the UC Davis Health System has thus attracted philanthropists and investments from the private sector.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)809-815
Number of pages7
JournalAcademic Medicine
Volume83
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2008

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reputation
Health
health
Research
commitment
Aptitude
Private Sector
Medical Schools
patient care
private sector
Decision Making
Patient Care
funding
expert
leadership
staff
Education
decision making
ability
Growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Education

Cite this

Linking academic and clinical missions : UC Davis' integrated AHC. / Pomeroy, Claire; Rice, Ann; McGowan, William; Osburn, Nathan.

In: Academic Medicine, Vol. 83, No. 9, 09.2008, p. 809-815.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pomeroy, C, Rice, A, McGowan, W & Osburn, N 2008, 'Linking academic and clinical missions: UC Davis' integrated AHC', Academic Medicine, vol. 83, no. 9, pp. 809-815. https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0b013e318181d147
Pomeroy, Claire ; Rice, Ann ; McGowan, William ; Osburn, Nathan. / Linking academic and clinical missions : UC Davis' integrated AHC. In: Academic Medicine. 2008 ; Vol. 83, No. 9. pp. 809-815.
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