Limitations of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting for the treatment of disease of the superficial femoral and popliteal arteries

John R. Laird

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

108 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The long-term primary patency rates for percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) and stenting in treatment of disease of the superficial femoral and popliteal arteries have been disappointing. Three-year primary patency rates of ∼50% have been reported for PTA and first-generation stents. Early results with newer nitinol stents appear promising; however, long-term data are lacking. One- and 2-year primary patency rates of 76% to 97% and 60% to 84%, respectively, have been reported with nitinol stents. An emerging concern with nitinol stents is the frequency of stent fracture (≥25%) after interventions for long-segment disease. A recent study has shown that stent fractures are associated with in-stent restenosis and with significantly lower primary patency at 1 year. The therapeutic success of PTA and stenting correlates with the complexity of the underlying disease. The best results are achieved when treating focal stenoses in patients with good distal runoff. Because endovascular interventions are preferred by patients, can be repeated, and preserve the option of bypass surgery, PTA and stenting are increasingly employed for diffuse and complex SFA disease. Clarifying the role of PTA and stenting in the treatment of complex SFA disease will require future studies that stratify results by both lesion anatomy and treatment indication.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Endovascular Therapy
Volume13
Issue numberSUPPL. 2
StatePublished - Feb 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Popliteal Artery
Femoral Artery
Angioplasty
Stents
Therapeutics
Anatomy
Pathologic Constriction

Keywords

  • Endovascular therapy
  • Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty
  • Peripheral arterial disease
  • Stent

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

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abstract = "The long-term primary patency rates for percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) and stenting in treatment of disease of the superficial femoral and popliteal arteries have been disappointing. Three-year primary patency rates of ∼50{\%} have been reported for PTA and first-generation stents. Early results with newer nitinol stents appear promising; however, long-term data are lacking. One- and 2-year primary patency rates of 76{\%} to 97{\%} and 60{\%} to 84{\%}, respectively, have been reported with nitinol stents. An emerging concern with nitinol stents is the frequency of stent fracture (≥25{\%}) after interventions for long-segment disease. A recent study has shown that stent fractures are associated with in-stent restenosis and with significantly lower primary patency at 1 year. The therapeutic success of PTA and stenting correlates with the complexity of the underlying disease. The best results are achieved when treating focal stenoses in patients with good distal runoff. Because endovascular interventions are preferred by patients, can be repeated, and preserve the option of bypass surgery, PTA and stenting are increasingly employed for diffuse and complex SFA disease. Clarifying the role of PTA and stenting in the treatment of complex SFA disease will require future studies that stratify results by both lesion anatomy and treatment indication.",
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