Lighting programs for broiler chickens: Pre- and post-hatch effects on behavior, health, and productivity

J. A. Mench, G. S. Archer, R. A. Blatchford, H L Shivaprasad, G. M. Fagerberg, P. S. Wakenell

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lighting can have important effects on the welfare of poultry, but there have been few studies of the optimal photoperiods or light intensities for broiler chickens. Birds are sensitive to light stimulation even as embryos, so both pre- and post-hatch lighting regimes could have an impact. We conducted two experiments to examine lighting effects on broiler health and behavior. In the first, broiler eggs were incubated under either complete darkness (0L:24D), complete light (24L:0D), or 12 hours of light and 12 hours of darkness (12L:12D); chicks were then raised under a 12L: 12D photoperiod. In the second, chicks were raised under a 16L:8D photoperiod at one of three daytime illumination levels (dim to bright): 5 (typical commercial lighting), 50 or 200 lux. Treatment did not affect feed consumption, feed conversion, growth, mortality, or gait score. However, the eyes of both 0L:24D and 24L:0D broilers were significantly heavier at 5 lux. Activity rhythms were also affected: 24L:OD fed more during the 2 hours after the lights went on, and 5 lux were less active during the day. Broilers incubated under 0L.24D, or reared under 200 lux, were more fearful, as indicated by more intense wing flapping after being caught and inverted. In addition. 0L.24D broilers had more composite physical asymmetry, as assessed by differences in length and width of their toes and metatarsi, which is an indicator of developmental stress. These results demonstrate that providing light during incubation or brighter intensity light during rearing can have positive effects on broiler welfare without negatively affecting productivity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationLivestock Environment VIII - Proceedings of the 8th International Symposium
Pages453-456
Number of pages4
StatePublished - 2008
Event8th International Livestock Environment Symposium, ILES VIII - Iguassu Falls, Brazil
Duration: Aug 31 2008Sep 4 2008

Other

Other8th International Livestock Environment Symposium, ILES VIII
CountryBrazil
CityIguassu Falls
Period8/31/089/4/08

Fingerprint

Lighting
lighting
Chickens
broiler chickens
Light
Health
Photoperiod
photoperiod
Darkness
light intensity
chicks
Metatarsus
metatarsus
Health Behavior
Toes
gait
Poultry
health behavior
Gait
Eggs

Keywords

  • Chicken
  • Lighting
  • Welfare

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

Mench, J. A., Archer, G. S., Blatchford, R. A., Shivaprasad, H. L., Fagerberg, G. M., & Wakenell, P. S. (2008). Lighting programs for broiler chickens: Pre- and post-hatch effects on behavior, health, and productivity. In Livestock Environment VIII - Proceedings of the 8th International Symposium (pp. 453-456)

Lighting programs for broiler chickens : Pre- and post-hatch effects on behavior, health, and productivity. / Mench, J. A.; Archer, G. S.; Blatchford, R. A.; Shivaprasad, H L; Fagerberg, G. M.; Wakenell, P. S.

Livestock Environment VIII - Proceedings of the 8th International Symposium. 2008. p. 453-456.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Mench, JA, Archer, GS, Blatchford, RA, Shivaprasad, HL, Fagerberg, GM & Wakenell, PS 2008, Lighting programs for broiler chickens: Pre- and post-hatch effects on behavior, health, and productivity. in Livestock Environment VIII - Proceedings of the 8th International Symposium. pp. 453-456, 8th International Livestock Environment Symposium, ILES VIII, Iguassu Falls, Brazil, 8/31/08.
Mench JA, Archer GS, Blatchford RA, Shivaprasad HL, Fagerberg GM, Wakenell PS. Lighting programs for broiler chickens: Pre- and post-hatch effects on behavior, health, and productivity. In Livestock Environment VIII - Proceedings of the 8th International Symposium. 2008. p. 453-456
Mench, J. A. ; Archer, G. S. ; Blatchford, R. A. ; Shivaprasad, H L ; Fagerberg, G. M. ; Wakenell, P. S. / Lighting programs for broiler chickens : Pre- and post-hatch effects on behavior, health, and productivity. Livestock Environment VIII - Proceedings of the 8th International Symposium. 2008. pp. 453-456
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