Life and death of neurons in the aging brain

John Morrison, Patrick R. Hof

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

970 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Neurodegenerative disorders are characterized by extensive neuron death that leads to functional decline, but the neurobiological correlates of functional decline in normal aging are less well defined. For decades, it has been a commonly held notion that widespread neuron death in the neocortex and hippocampus is an inevitable concomitant of brain aging, but recent quantitative studies suggest that neuron death is restricted in normal aging and unlikely to account for age-related impairment of neocortical and hippocampal functions. In this article, the qualitative and quantitative differences between aging and Alzheimer's disease with respect to neuron loss are discussed, and age-related changes in functional and biochemical attributes of hippocampal circuits that might mediate functional decline in the absence of neuron death are explored. When these data are viewed comprehensively, it appears that the primary neurobiological substrates for functional impairment in aging differ in important ways from those in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)412-419
Number of pages8
JournalScience
Volume278
Issue number5337
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 17 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Neurons
Brain
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Alzheimer Disease
Neocortex
Hippocampus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Life and death of neurons in the aging brain. / Morrison, John; Hof, Patrick R.

In: Science, Vol. 278, No. 5337, 17.10.1997, p. 412-419.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Morrison, John ; Hof, Patrick R. / Life and death of neurons in the aging brain. In: Science. 1997 ; Vol. 278, No. 5337. pp. 412-419.
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