Levels of soluble platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 and P-selectin are decreased in children with autism spectrum disorder

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Abstract

Background: Although the etiopathology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is not clear, there is increasing evidence that dysfunction in the immune system affects many children with ASD. Findings of immune dysfunction in ASD include increases in inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and microglial activity in brain tissue and cerebrospinal fluid, as well as abnormal peripheral immune cell function. Methods: Adhesion molecules, such as platelet endothelial adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), P-selectin, and L-selectin, function to facilitate leukocyte transendothelial migration. We assessed concentrations of soluble adhesion molecules, sPECAM-1, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, sP-selectin, and sL-selectin in the plasma of 49 participants with ASD and 31 typically developing controls of the same age, all of whom were enrolled as part of the Autism Phenome Project. Behavioral assessment, the levels of soluble adhesion molecules, and head circumference were compared in the same subjects. Results: Levels of sPECAM-1 and sP-selectin were significantly reduced in the ASD group compared to typically developing controls (p <.02). Soluble PECAM-1 levels were negatively associated with repetitive behavior and abnormal brain growth in children with ASD (p =.03). Conclusions: Because adhesion molecules modulate the permeability and signaling at the blood-brain barrier as well as leukocyte infiltration into the central nervous system, the current data suggest a role for these molecules in the complex pathophysiology of ASD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1020-1025
Number of pages6
JournalBiological Psychiatry
Volume72
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 15 2012

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CD31 Antigens
P-Selectin
Selectins
Leukocytes
Transendothelial and Transepithelial Migration
L-Selectin
Brain
Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1
Autistic Disorder
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Blood-Brain Barrier
Chemokines
Blood Vessels
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Immune System
Permeability
Blood Platelets
Central Nervous System
Head
Cytokines

Keywords

  • Adhesion
  • autism
  • CD31
  • CD62-P
  • P-Selectin
  • PECAM-1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biological Psychiatry

Cite this

@article{68b8f3f146a84d65a49e1853deab8868,
title = "Levels of soluble platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 and P-selectin are decreased in children with autism spectrum disorder",
abstract = "Background: Although the etiopathology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is not clear, there is increasing evidence that dysfunction in the immune system affects many children with ASD. Findings of immune dysfunction in ASD include increases in inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and microglial activity in brain tissue and cerebrospinal fluid, as well as abnormal peripheral immune cell function. Methods: Adhesion molecules, such as platelet endothelial adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), P-selectin, and L-selectin, function to facilitate leukocyte transendothelial migration. We assessed concentrations of soluble adhesion molecules, sPECAM-1, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, sP-selectin, and sL-selectin in the plasma of 49 participants with ASD and 31 typically developing controls of the same age, all of whom were enrolled as part of the Autism Phenome Project. Behavioral assessment, the levels of soluble adhesion molecules, and head circumference were compared in the same subjects. Results: Levels of sPECAM-1 and sP-selectin were significantly reduced in the ASD group compared to typically developing controls (p <.02). Soluble PECAM-1 levels were negatively associated with repetitive behavior and abnormal brain growth in children with ASD (p =.03). Conclusions: Because adhesion molecules modulate the permeability and signaling at the blood-brain barrier as well as leukocyte infiltration into the central nervous system, the current data suggest a role for these molecules in the complex pathophysiology of ASD.",
keywords = "Adhesion, autism, CD31, CD62-P, P-Selectin, PECAM-1",
author = "Onore, {Charity E.} and Nordahl, {Christine W} and Young, {Gregory S.} and {Van de Water}, {Judith A} and Rogers, {Sally J} and Paul Ashwood",
year = "2012",
month = "12",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/j.biopsych.2012.05.004",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "72",
pages = "1020--1025",
journal = "Biological Psychiatry",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Levels of soluble platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 and P-selectin are decreased in children with autism spectrum disorder

AU - Onore, Charity E.

AU - Nordahl, Christine W

AU - Young, Gregory S.

AU - Van de Water, Judith A

AU - Rogers, Sally J

AU - Ashwood, Paul

PY - 2012/12/15

Y1 - 2012/12/15

N2 - Background: Although the etiopathology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is not clear, there is increasing evidence that dysfunction in the immune system affects many children with ASD. Findings of immune dysfunction in ASD include increases in inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and microglial activity in brain tissue and cerebrospinal fluid, as well as abnormal peripheral immune cell function. Methods: Adhesion molecules, such as platelet endothelial adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), P-selectin, and L-selectin, function to facilitate leukocyte transendothelial migration. We assessed concentrations of soluble adhesion molecules, sPECAM-1, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, sP-selectin, and sL-selectin in the plasma of 49 participants with ASD and 31 typically developing controls of the same age, all of whom were enrolled as part of the Autism Phenome Project. Behavioral assessment, the levels of soluble adhesion molecules, and head circumference were compared in the same subjects. Results: Levels of sPECAM-1 and sP-selectin were significantly reduced in the ASD group compared to typically developing controls (p <.02). Soluble PECAM-1 levels were negatively associated with repetitive behavior and abnormal brain growth in children with ASD (p =.03). Conclusions: Because adhesion molecules modulate the permeability and signaling at the blood-brain barrier as well as leukocyte infiltration into the central nervous system, the current data suggest a role for these molecules in the complex pathophysiology of ASD.

AB - Background: Although the etiopathology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is not clear, there is increasing evidence that dysfunction in the immune system affects many children with ASD. Findings of immune dysfunction in ASD include increases in inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and microglial activity in brain tissue and cerebrospinal fluid, as well as abnormal peripheral immune cell function. Methods: Adhesion molecules, such as platelet endothelial adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), P-selectin, and L-selectin, function to facilitate leukocyte transendothelial migration. We assessed concentrations of soluble adhesion molecules, sPECAM-1, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, sP-selectin, and sL-selectin in the plasma of 49 participants with ASD and 31 typically developing controls of the same age, all of whom were enrolled as part of the Autism Phenome Project. Behavioral assessment, the levels of soluble adhesion molecules, and head circumference were compared in the same subjects. Results: Levels of sPECAM-1 and sP-selectin were significantly reduced in the ASD group compared to typically developing controls (p <.02). Soluble PECAM-1 levels were negatively associated with repetitive behavior and abnormal brain growth in children with ASD (p =.03). Conclusions: Because adhesion molecules modulate the permeability and signaling at the blood-brain barrier as well as leukocyte infiltration into the central nervous system, the current data suggest a role for these molecules in the complex pathophysiology of ASD.

KW - Adhesion

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KW - CD62-P

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