Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgendered, or Intersexed Content for Nursing Curricula

Ann Marie Walsh Brennan, Jane Barnsteiner, Mary Lou de Leon Siantz, Valeri T. Cotter, Janine Everett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There has been limited identification of core lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, or intersexed (LGBTI) experience concepts that should be included in the nursing curricula. This article addresses the gap in the literature. To move nursing toward the goals of health equity and cultural humility in practice, education, and research, nursing curricula must integrate core LGBTI concepts, experiences, and needs related to health and illness. This article reviews LGBTI health care literature to address the attitudes, knowledge, and skills needed to address curricular gaps and provide content suggestions for inclusion in nursing curricula. Also considered is the need to expand nursing students' definition of diversity before discussing the interplay between nurses' attitudes and culturally competent care provided to persons who are LGBTI. Knowledge needed includes a life span perspective that addresses developmental needs and their impact on health concerns throughout the life course; health promotion and disease prevention with an articulation of unique health issues for this population; mental health concerns; specific health needs of transgender and intersex individuals; barriers to health care; interventions and resources including Internet sites; and legal and policy issues. Particular assessment and communication skills for LGBTI patients are identified. Finally, there is a discussion of didactic, simulation, and clinical strategies for incorporating this content into nursing curricula at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)96-104
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Professional Nursing
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012

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Transgender Persons
Curriculum
Nursing
Health
Sexual Minorities
Nursing Education Research
Delivery of Health Care
Nursing Students

Keywords

  • Bisexual
  • Gay
  • Lesbian
  • Nursing curricula content
  • Transgender

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgendered, or Intersexed Content for Nursing Curricula. / Brennan, Ann Marie Walsh; Barnsteiner, Jane; de Leon Siantz, Mary Lou; Cotter, Valeri T.; Everett, Janine.

In: Journal of Professional Nursing, Vol. 28, No. 2, 03.2012, p. 96-104.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brennan, Ann Marie Walsh ; Barnsteiner, Jane ; de Leon Siantz, Mary Lou ; Cotter, Valeri T. ; Everett, Janine. / Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgendered, or Intersexed Content for Nursing Curricula. In: Journal of Professional Nursing. 2012 ; Vol. 28, No. 2. pp. 96-104.
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