Length control of the metaphase spindle

Gohta Goshima, Roy Wollman, Nico Stuurman, Jonathan M. Scholey, Ronald D. Vale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

185 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The pole-to-pole distance of the metaphase spindle is reasonably constant in a given cell type; in the case of vertebrate female oocytes, this steady-state length can be maintained for substantial lengths of time, during which time microtubules remain highly dynamic. Although a number of molecular perturbations have been shown to influence spindle length, a global understanding of the factors that determine metaphase spindle length has not been achieved. Results: Using the Drosophila S2 cell line, we depleted or overexpressed proteins that either generate sliding forces between spindle microtubules (Kinesin-5, Kinesin-14, dynein), promote microtubule polymerization (EB1, Mast/Orbit [CLASP], Minispindles [Dis1/XMAP215/TOG]) or depolymerization (Kinesin-8, Kinesin-13), or mediate sister-chromatid cohesion (Rad21) in order to explore how these forces influence spindle length. Using high-throughput automated microscopy and semiautomated image analyses of >4000 spindles, we found a reduction in spindle size after RNAi of microtubule-polymerizing factors or overexpression of Kinesin-8, whereas longer spindles resulted from the knockdown of Rad21, Kinesin-8, or Kinesin-13. In contrast, and differing from previous reports, bipolar spindle length is relatively insensitive to increases in motor-generated sliding forces. However, an ultrasensitive monopolar-to-bipolar transition in spindle architecture was observed at a critical concentration of the Kinesin-5 sliding motor. These observations could be explained by a quantitative model that proposes a coupling between microtubule depolymerization rates and microtubule sliding forces. Conclusions: By integrating extensive RNAi with high-throughput image-processing methodology and mathematical modeling, we reach to a conclusion that metaphase spindle length is sensitive to alterations in microtubule dynamics and sister-chromatid cohesion, but robust against alterations of microtubule sliding force.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1979-1988
Number of pages10
JournalCurrent Biology
Volume15
Issue number22
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 22 2005

Fingerprint

Kinesin
kinesin
Metaphase
metaphase
Microtubules
microtubules
Depolymerization
Chromatids
chromatids
depolymerization
RNA Interference
cohesion
polymerization
Poles
Throughput
Dyneins
orbits
Orbit
Polymerization
Drosophila

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Goshima, G., Wollman, R., Stuurman, N., Scholey, J. M., & Vale, R. D. (2005). Length control of the metaphase spindle. Current Biology, 15(22), 1979-1988. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2005.09.054

Length control of the metaphase spindle. / Goshima, Gohta; Wollman, Roy; Stuurman, Nico; Scholey, Jonathan M.; Vale, Ronald D.

In: Current Biology, Vol. 15, No. 22, 22.11.2005, p. 1979-1988.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Goshima, G, Wollman, R, Stuurman, N, Scholey, JM & Vale, RD 2005, 'Length control of the metaphase spindle', Current Biology, vol. 15, no. 22, pp. 1979-1988. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2005.09.054
Goshima G, Wollman R, Stuurman N, Scholey JM, Vale RD. Length control of the metaphase spindle. Current Biology. 2005 Nov 22;15(22):1979-1988. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2005.09.054
Goshima, Gohta ; Wollman, Roy ; Stuurman, Nico ; Scholey, Jonathan M. ; Vale, Ronald D. / Length control of the metaphase spindle. In: Current Biology. 2005 ; Vol. 15, No. 22. pp. 1979-1988.
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