Lateralization of language

Toward a biologically based model of language

Kathleen Baynes, Michael S. Gazzaniga

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

If the biological basis of language is to provide insight for linguistic theory, description of the aspects of language that play a role in the determination of language lateralization is essential. This article will summarize what is known about the distribution of language across the hemispheres using information from the Wada procedure and comparing those results with those from investigations using newer less invasive methods like fMRI. This article will also describe what is known about the limits of language in the isolated right hemisphere when acquired during normal language development. The profile of language in the isolated right hemisphere may qualify as one model of an evolutionarily older "protolanguage." Questions posed in both of these areas provide a rich opportunity for interaction between linguists, psycholinguists, and neuropsychologists.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)303-326
Number of pages24
JournalLinguistic Review
Volume22
Issue number2-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 12 2005

Fingerprint

language
Lateralization
Language
linguistics
interaction
Right Hemisphere
Linguistic Theory
Proto-language
Psycholinguists
Language Lateralization
Language Development
Interaction
Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Hemisphere

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

Lateralization of language : Toward a biologically based model of language. / Baynes, Kathleen; Gazzaniga, Michael S.

In: Linguistic Review, Vol. 22, No. 2-4, 12.12.2005, p. 303-326.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Baynes, Kathleen ; Gazzaniga, Michael S. / Lateralization of language : Toward a biologically based model of language. In: Linguistic Review. 2005 ; Vol. 22, No. 2-4. pp. 303-326.
@article{591f5c2cbaf4462b98af4c24cf11556b,
title = "Lateralization of language: Toward a biologically based model of language",
abstract = "If the biological basis of language is to provide insight for linguistic theory, description of the aspects of language that play a role in the determination of language lateralization is essential. This article will summarize what is known about the distribution of language across the hemispheres using information from the Wada procedure and comparing those results with those from investigations using newer less invasive methods like fMRI. This article will also describe what is known about the limits of language in the isolated right hemisphere when acquired during normal language development. The profile of language in the isolated right hemisphere may qualify as one model of an evolutionarily older {"}protolanguage.{"} Questions posed in both of these areas provide a rich opportunity for interaction between linguists, psycholinguists, and neuropsychologists.",
author = "Kathleen Baynes and Gazzaniga, {Michael S.}",
year = "2005",
month = "12",
day = "12",
doi = "10.1515/tlir.2005.22.2-4.303",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "22",
pages = "303--326",
journal = "Linguistic Review",
issn = "0167-6318",
publisher = "Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co. KG",
number = "2-4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Lateralization of language

T2 - Toward a biologically based model of language

AU - Baynes, Kathleen

AU - Gazzaniga, Michael S.

PY - 2005/12/12

Y1 - 2005/12/12

N2 - If the biological basis of language is to provide insight for linguistic theory, description of the aspects of language that play a role in the determination of language lateralization is essential. This article will summarize what is known about the distribution of language across the hemispheres using information from the Wada procedure and comparing those results with those from investigations using newer less invasive methods like fMRI. This article will also describe what is known about the limits of language in the isolated right hemisphere when acquired during normal language development. The profile of language in the isolated right hemisphere may qualify as one model of an evolutionarily older "protolanguage." Questions posed in both of these areas provide a rich opportunity for interaction between linguists, psycholinguists, and neuropsychologists.

AB - If the biological basis of language is to provide insight for linguistic theory, description of the aspects of language that play a role in the determination of language lateralization is essential. This article will summarize what is known about the distribution of language across the hemispheres using information from the Wada procedure and comparing those results with those from investigations using newer less invasive methods like fMRI. This article will also describe what is known about the limits of language in the isolated right hemisphere when acquired during normal language development. The profile of language in the isolated right hemisphere may qualify as one model of an evolutionarily older "protolanguage." Questions posed in both of these areas provide a rich opportunity for interaction between linguists, psycholinguists, and neuropsychologists.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=29144478360&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=29144478360&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1515/tlir.2005.22.2-4.303

DO - 10.1515/tlir.2005.22.2-4.303

M3 - Review article

VL - 22

SP - 303

EP - 326

JO - Linguistic Review

JF - Linguistic Review

SN - 0167-6318

IS - 2-4

ER -