Large area picosecond photodetector (LAPPDTM) offers fast timing for nuclear physics and medical imaging

M. J. Minot, B. W. Adams, M. J. Aviles, S. Butler, C. D. Ertley, T. Cremer, M. R. Foley, C. J. Hamel, A. V. Lyashenko, M. A. Popecki, T. W. Rivera, M. E. Stochaj, S. I. Kwon, S. Majewski, S. R. Cherry, W. A. Worstell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The availability of large-area, economically produced, microchannel plate (MCP) photodetectors with tens of picosecond timing resolution and millimeter level spatial resolution for single photoelectrons are enabling new techniques where fast timing facilitates critical benefits including: more efficient background rejection and high vertex resolution in large scale high energy and nuclear physics (HEP and NP) experiments, particle track directionality information, and precise track reconstruction, as well as separation of Cherenkov and scintillation light. LAPPDs are now being produced on a routine pilot production basis, and are available to be employed in high energy and nuclear physics, for commercial applications such as in detectors for mass spectrometers, neutron detection for scientific and homeland security (non-proliferation), and for medical imaging time-of-flight positron emission tomography (TOF-PET). In the following, we provide an update on target performance of routinely produced prototype LAPPDs, including the performance of one specific LAPPD which is being evaluated at UC Davis for potential TOF-PET application. Previously obtained preliminary TOF-PET test results, taken at Incom Inc. with an earlier LAPPD, are also discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberA11
JournalNuovo Cimento della Societa Italiana di Fisica C
Volume43
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Large area picosecond photodetector (LAPPD<sup>TM</sup>) offers fast timing for nuclear physics and medical imaging'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this