Laparoscopic-assisted peritoneal dialysis catheter placement, an improvement on the single trocar technique

Walter D. Blessing, Jamie Lynn Ross, Colleen I. Kennedy, William S. Richardson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In 2002, Ochsner laparoscopic surgeons and nephrologists began placing peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheters via a laparoscopic-assisted method. We compared laparoscopically placed PD catheters (LAPD) with catheters most recently placed without laparoscopic aid (STPD). The method for this study is a retrospective chart review. Demographics of both groups were similar. Nine of 20 (45%) in the STPD group and 16 of 23 (70%) in the LAPD group had had previous abdominal surgery. Three of 20 (15%) of STPD had complications, including one small bowel injury. Four of 23 (17.4%) of the LAPD had complications. One of 20 (5%) in the STPD group and 3 of 23 (13%) in the LAPD group had dialysate leaks. In the STPD group, 8 of 20 (40%) had catheter problems that led to removal in 7 (35%). In the LAPD group, 6 of 23 (26%) had catheter malfunction: 3 were salvaged with a laparoscopic procedure; 3 (13%) were removed for malfunction. 1) LAPD allows proper PD placement after complex abdominal surgery; 2) Although dialysate leak complications are increased, bowel perforation risk is less; 3) Because of proper placement, PD catheter malfunction rate is less with LAPD; 4) Although no results obtained statistical significance, we found LAPD superior to STPD and have converted to this technique.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1042-1046
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume71
Issue number12
StatePublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Peritoneal Dialysis
Surgical Instruments
Catheters
Dialysis Solutions
Demography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Laparoscopic-assisted peritoneal dialysis catheter placement, an improvement on the single trocar technique. / Blessing, Walter D.; Ross, Jamie Lynn; Kennedy, Colleen I.; Richardson, William S.

In: American Surgeon, Vol. 71, No. 12, 2005, p. 1042-1046.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Blessing, Walter D. ; Ross, Jamie Lynn ; Kennedy, Colleen I. ; Richardson, William S. / Laparoscopic-assisted peritoneal dialysis catheter placement, an improvement on the single trocar technique. In: American Surgeon. 2005 ; Vol. 71, No. 12. pp. 1042-1046.
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