Language deficits, localization, and grammar: Evidence for a distributive model of language breakdown in aphasic patients and neurologically intact individuals

Frederic Dick, Elizabeth Bates, Jennifer Aydelott Utman, Beverly Wulfeck, Nina Dronkers, Morton Ann Gernsbacher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Selective deficits in aphasic patients' grammatical production and comprehension are often cited as evidence that syntactic processing is modular and localizable in discrete areas of the brain (e.g., Y. Grodzinsky, 2000). The authors review a large body of experimental evidence suggesting that morphosyntactic deficits can be observed in a number of aphasic and neurologically intact populations. They present new data showing that receptive agrammatism is found not only over a range of aphasic groups, but is also observed in neurologically intact individuals processing under stressful conditions. The authors suggest that these data are most compatible with a domain-general account of language, one that emphasizes the interaction of linguistic distributions with the properties of an associative processor working under normal or suboptimal conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)759-788
Number of pages30
JournalPsychological Review
Volume108
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2001
Externally publishedYes

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Broca Aphasia
Linguistics
Language
Brain
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Language deficits, localization, and grammar : Evidence for a distributive model of language breakdown in aphasic patients and neurologically intact individuals. / Dick, Frederic; Bates, Elizabeth; Utman, Jennifer Aydelott; Wulfeck, Beverly; Dronkers, Nina; Gernsbacher, Morton Ann.

In: Psychological Review, Vol. 108, No. 4, 10.2001, p. 759-788.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dick, Frederic ; Bates, Elizabeth ; Utman, Jennifer Aydelott ; Wulfeck, Beverly ; Dronkers, Nina ; Gernsbacher, Morton Ann. / Language deficits, localization, and grammar : Evidence for a distributive model of language breakdown in aphasic patients and neurologically intact individuals. In: Psychological Review. 2001 ; Vol. 108, No. 4. pp. 759-788.
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