Landscape epidemiology of vector-borne diseases

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

166 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Landscape epidemiology describes how the temporal dynamics of host, vector, and pathogen populations interact spatially within a permissive environment to enable transmission. The spatially defined focus, or nidus, of transmission may be characterized by vegetation as well as by climate, latitude, elevation, and geology. The ecological complexity, dimensions, and temporal stability of the nidus are determined largely by pathogen natural history and vector bionomics. Host populations, transmission efficiency, and therefore pathogen amplification vary spatially, thereby creating a heterogeneous surface that may be defined by remote sensing and statistical tools. The current review describes the evolution of landscape epidemiology as a science and exemplifies selected aspects by contrasting the ecology of two different recent disease outbreaks in North America caused by West Nile virus, an explosive, highly virulent mosquito-borne virus producing ephemeral nidi, and Borrelia burgdorferi, a slowly amplifying chronic pathogen producing semipermanent nidi.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)461-483
Number of pages23
JournalAnnual Review of Entomology
Volume55
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

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Neottia
vector-borne diseases
epidemiology
pathogen
pathogens
West Nile virus
ecology
Borrelia burgdorferi
geology
mosquito
natural history
remote sensing
explosive
amplification
Culicidae
virus
climate
viruses
vegetation
history

Keywords

  • Climate
  • Host
  • Nidus
  • Pathogen
  • Refugia
  • Spatial dynamics
  • Vector

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Insect Science
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Landscape epidemiology of vector-borne diseases. / Reisen, William.

In: Annual Review of Entomology, Vol. 55, 01.01.2010, p. 461-483.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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