Lactation performance of exercising women

Cheryl A. Lovelady, Bo Lonnerdal, Kathryn G. Dewey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To determine whether vigorous exercise affects lactation performance, we compared well-nourished exercising (n = 8) and sedentary (n = 8) women whose infants were 9-24 wk old and exclusively breast-fed. Measurements included resting metabolic rate (RMR); maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max); plasma prolactin, cortisol, insulin, and T3; and body composition. Each subject completed a 3-d record of dietary intake, physical activity, and milk volume (by test weighing) and collected 24-h milk samples. Exercising women differed significantly from control subjects in VO2max (46.4 vs 30.3 mL·kg-1·min-1), percent body fat (21.7 vs 27.9%), total energy expenditure (3169 vs 2398 kcal/d), and energy intake (2739 vs 2051 kcal/d). There was no difference between the groups in plasma hormones or milk energy, lipid, protein, or lactose content. Exercising subjects tended to have higher milk volume (839 vs 776 g/d) and energy output in milk (538 vs 494 kcal/d). Thus, there was no apparent adverse effect of vigorous exercise on lactation performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)103-109
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume52
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jul 1990

Fingerprint

Lactation
Milk
lactation
milk
Exercise
exercise
Diet Records
Basal Metabolism
resting metabolic rate
energy
triiodothyronine
Lactose
prolactin
Body Composition
Energy Intake
Oxygen Consumption
energy expenditure
physical activity
Prolactin
Energy Metabolism

Keywords

  • Body composition
  • Breast-milk volume and composition
  • Energy expenditure
  • Energy intake
  • Exercise
  • Lactation
  • Prolactin
  • Resting metabolic rate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Lovelady, C. A., Lonnerdal, B., & Dewey, K. G. (1990). Lactation performance of exercising women. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 52(1), 103-109.

Lactation performance of exercising women. / Lovelady, Cheryl A.; Lonnerdal, Bo; Dewey, Kathryn G.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 52, No. 1, 07.1990, p. 103-109.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lovelady, CA, Lonnerdal, B & Dewey, KG 1990, 'Lactation performance of exercising women', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 52, no. 1, pp. 103-109.
Lovelady CA, Lonnerdal B, Dewey KG. Lactation performance of exercising women. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1990 Jul;52(1):103-109.
Lovelady, Cheryl A. ; Lonnerdal, Bo ; Dewey, Kathryn G. / Lactation performance of exercising women. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1990 ; Vol. 52, No. 1. pp. 103-109.
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