L-arginine supplementation enhances exhaled NO, breath condensate VEGF, and headache at 4342 m

Jim K. Mansoor, Brian M Morrissey, William F. Walby, Ken Y Yoneda, Maya Juarez, Radhika Kajekar, John W. Severinghaus, Marlowe W. Eldridge, Edward S Schelegle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined the effect of dietary supplementation with L-arginine on breath condensate VEGF, exhaled nitric oxide (NO), plasma erythropoietin, symptoms of acute mountain sickness, and respiratory related sensations at 4342 m through the course of 24 h in seven healthy male subjects. Serum L-arginine levels increased in treated subjects at time 0, 8, and 24 h compared with placebo, indicating the effectiveness of our treatment. L-arginine had no significant effect on overall Lake Louise scores compared with placebo. However, there was a significant increase in headache within the L-arginine treatment group at 12 h compared with time 0, a change not seen in the placebo condition between these two time points. There was a trend (p = 0.087) toward greater exhaled NO and significant increases in breath condensate VEGF with L-arginine treatment, but no L-arginine effect on serum EPO. These results suggest that L-arginine supplementation increases HIF-1 stabilization in the lung, possibly through a NO-dependent pathway. In total, our observations indicate that L-arginine supplementation is not beneficial in the prophylactic treatment of AMS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)289-300
Number of pages12
JournalHigh Altitude Medicine and Biology
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2005

Fingerprint

Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
Headache
Arginine
Nitric Oxide
Placebos
Altitude Sickness
Lakes
Erythropoietin
Dietary Supplements
Serum
Healthy Volunteers
Therapeutics
Lung

Keywords

  • Altitude
  • EPO
  • HIF-1
  • Hypoxia
  • Lake Louise scores

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Physiology
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

L-arginine supplementation enhances exhaled NO, breath condensate VEGF, and headache at 4342 m. / Mansoor, Jim K.; Morrissey, Brian M; Walby, William F.; Yoneda, Ken Y; Juarez, Maya; Kajekar, Radhika; Severinghaus, John W.; Eldridge, Marlowe W.; Schelegle, Edward S.

In: High Altitude Medicine and Biology, Vol. 6, No. 4, 12.2005, p. 289-300.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mansoor, Jim K. ; Morrissey, Brian M ; Walby, William F. ; Yoneda, Ken Y ; Juarez, Maya ; Kajekar, Radhika ; Severinghaus, John W. ; Eldridge, Marlowe W. ; Schelegle, Edward S. / L-arginine supplementation enhances exhaled NO, breath condensate VEGF, and headache at 4342 m. In: High Altitude Medicine and Biology. 2005 ; Vol. 6, No. 4. pp. 289-300.
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