Knowledge of and perceived access to emergency contraception at two urgent care clinics in California

Eleanor Schwarz, Matthew F. Reeves, Barbara Gerbert, Ralph Gonzales

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: California allowed women access to emergency contraception (EC) without a physicians' prescription in 2002. Methods: To assess knowledge of and perceived access to EC among California women outside of family planning settings, we administered a computerized survey to women, age 18-45 years, who could become pregnant, in the waiting areas of two urgent care clinics in San Francisco in 2005. Results: Four hundred forty-six women were enrolled. Most women [87%; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 83-89%] in this well-educated (48% had college degrees), ethnically diverse sample knew that a postcoital contraceptive exists. However, many women (32%; 95% CI, 28-37%) did not know EC is currently available in California. Only 49% of women knew that using EC will have no adverse effect on their future fertility and only 15% knew that EC will not cause a miscarriage or birth defects if used by a woman who is pregnant. Seven percent thought EC was not at all effective and 27% thought EC was somewhat or very unsafe. Eight percent had EC at home for future use. Conclusions: Functional knowledge of EC remains limited in California. Public education campaigns are needed to allow women to benefit from pharmacy direct access to EC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)209-213
Number of pages5
JournalContraception
Volume75
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Postcoital Contraception
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Postcoital Contraceptives
Confidence Intervals
San Francisco
Family Planning Services
Spontaneous Abortion
Prescriptions
Fertility

Keywords

  • Emergency contraception
  • Urgent care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Knowledge of and perceived access to emergency contraception at two urgent care clinics in California. / Schwarz, Eleanor; Reeves, Matthew F.; Gerbert, Barbara; Gonzales, Ralph.

In: Contraception, Vol. 75, No. 3, 01.03.2007, p. 209-213.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schwarz, Eleanor ; Reeves, Matthew F. ; Gerbert, Barbara ; Gonzales, Ralph. / Knowledge of and perceived access to emergency contraception at two urgent care clinics in California. In: Contraception. 2007 ; Vol. 75, No. 3. pp. 209-213.
@article{fa7533de709c4532b44ac5668e7ab22f,
title = "Knowledge of and perceived access to emergency contraception at two urgent care clinics in California",
abstract = "Background: California allowed women access to emergency contraception (EC) without a physicians' prescription in 2002. Methods: To assess knowledge of and perceived access to EC among California women outside of family planning settings, we administered a computerized survey to women, age 18-45 years, who could become pregnant, in the waiting areas of two urgent care clinics in San Francisco in 2005. Results: Four hundred forty-six women were enrolled. Most women [87{\%}; 95{\%} confidence interval (95{\%} CI), 83-89{\%}] in this well-educated (48{\%} had college degrees), ethnically diverse sample knew that a postcoital contraceptive exists. However, many women (32{\%}; 95{\%} CI, 28-37{\%}) did not know EC is currently available in California. Only 49{\%} of women knew that using EC will have no adverse effect on their future fertility and only 15{\%} knew that EC will not cause a miscarriage or birth defects if used by a woman who is pregnant. Seven percent thought EC was not at all effective and 27{\%} thought EC was somewhat or very unsafe. Eight percent had EC at home for future use. Conclusions: Functional knowledge of EC remains limited in California. Public education campaigns are needed to allow women to benefit from pharmacy direct access to EC.",
keywords = "Emergency contraception, Urgent care",
author = "Eleanor Schwarz and Reeves, {Matthew F.} and Barbara Gerbert and Ralph Gonzales",
year = "2007",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.contraception.2006.11.006",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "75",
pages = "209--213",
journal = "Contraception",
issn = "0010-7824",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Knowledge of and perceived access to emergency contraception at two urgent care clinics in California

AU - Schwarz, Eleanor

AU - Reeves, Matthew F.

AU - Gerbert, Barbara

AU - Gonzales, Ralph

PY - 2007/3/1

Y1 - 2007/3/1

N2 - Background: California allowed women access to emergency contraception (EC) without a physicians' prescription in 2002. Methods: To assess knowledge of and perceived access to EC among California women outside of family planning settings, we administered a computerized survey to women, age 18-45 years, who could become pregnant, in the waiting areas of two urgent care clinics in San Francisco in 2005. Results: Four hundred forty-six women were enrolled. Most women [87%; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 83-89%] in this well-educated (48% had college degrees), ethnically diverse sample knew that a postcoital contraceptive exists. However, many women (32%; 95% CI, 28-37%) did not know EC is currently available in California. Only 49% of women knew that using EC will have no adverse effect on their future fertility and only 15% knew that EC will not cause a miscarriage or birth defects if used by a woman who is pregnant. Seven percent thought EC was not at all effective and 27% thought EC was somewhat or very unsafe. Eight percent had EC at home for future use. Conclusions: Functional knowledge of EC remains limited in California. Public education campaigns are needed to allow women to benefit from pharmacy direct access to EC.

AB - Background: California allowed women access to emergency contraception (EC) without a physicians' prescription in 2002. Methods: To assess knowledge of and perceived access to EC among California women outside of family planning settings, we administered a computerized survey to women, age 18-45 years, who could become pregnant, in the waiting areas of two urgent care clinics in San Francisco in 2005. Results: Four hundred forty-six women were enrolled. Most women [87%; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 83-89%] in this well-educated (48% had college degrees), ethnically diverse sample knew that a postcoital contraceptive exists. However, many women (32%; 95% CI, 28-37%) did not know EC is currently available in California. Only 49% of women knew that using EC will have no adverse effect on their future fertility and only 15% knew that EC will not cause a miscarriage or birth defects if used by a woman who is pregnant. Seven percent thought EC was not at all effective and 27% thought EC was somewhat or very unsafe. Eight percent had EC at home for future use. Conclusions: Functional knowledge of EC remains limited in California. Public education campaigns are needed to allow women to benefit from pharmacy direct access to EC.

KW - Emergency contraception

KW - Urgent care

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33846839086&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33846839086&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.contraception.2006.11.006

DO - 10.1016/j.contraception.2006.11.006

M3 - Article

C2 - 17303491

AN - SCOPUS:33846839086

VL - 75

SP - 209

EP - 213

JO - Contraception

JF - Contraception

SN - 0010-7824

IS - 3

ER -