Knowledge about schizophrenia and social distance toward individuals with schizophrenia: A survey among predominantly low-income, urban, African American community members

Michelle L. Esterberg, Michael T. Compton, Robin Mcgee, Ruth Shim, Karen Hochman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study surveyed 111 urban African American community members regarding their level of familiarity with mental illness, knowledge about schizophrenia, and social distance toward individuals with schizophrenia. The participants were predominantly Protestant, with relatively low educational attainment and low income. Knowledge and social distance scores were not significantly correlated. Independently significant predictors of knowledge about schizophrenia, which accounted for 49% of the variance in scores, included level of educational attainment, gender, having a friend with a history of psychiatric treatment, and having known someone with schizophrenia. Independent predictors of social distance scores included family history of psychiatric treatment and family history of schizophrenia, which accounted for 14% of variance in scores. Further research involving specific racial, ethnic, cultural, and socioeconomic groups is needed to better understand the complex associations underlying knowledge about schizophrenia and stigma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)86-93
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Psychiatric Practice
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Knowledge
  • Mental health literacy
  • Schizophrenia
  • Social distance
  • Stigma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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