Kinetics of HIV infection of human placental syncytiotrophoblast cultures: An ultrastructural and immunocytochemical study

F. Fazely, G. N. Fry, T. L. Thirkill, H. Hakim, B. F. King, Gordon C Douglas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We previously demonstrated that syncytiotrophoblast (ST) cells from term human placentas could be infected when cocultured with HIV-infected lymphocytic cells. Here, we have used fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy to examine the kinetics of this infection process. Molt-4 clone 8 cells infected with HIV-1(Lai) or filtered supernatant from these cultures were incubated with ST cells for different times. In cell-associated infection, immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that some ST colonies were positive for HIV core proteins (p24,p55) after 1 hr. The number of positive colonies and the intensity of the ST-associated fluorescence increased with time. Transmission electron microscopy showed viral particles with HIV morphology associated with the ST cell surface at 1 hr. Immature virions with budding morphology were observed at 2 hr. In cell- free infection, positive p24,p55 staining was first detected in a few ST colonies at 4 hr. The number of positive colonies increased with time. At 24 hr, the fluorescence pattern and intensity resembled that seen with cell- mediated infection at 4 hr. Transmission electron microscopy revealed an increasing number of viral particles associated with the ST cell plasma membrane with respect to time, and budding virions first appeared at 8 hr. These results demonstrate that HIV infection of placental ST cells proceeds very rapidly in culture and that, furthermore, cell-associated infection of ST is much more efficient than the infection with cell-free virus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1023-1030
Number of pages8
JournalAIDS Research and Human Retroviruses
Volume11
Issue number9
StatePublished - 1995

Fingerprint

Trophoblasts
HIV Infections
Virion
Infection
Transmission Electron Microscopy
Fluorescence Microscopy
Fluorescence
HIV Core Protein p24
Cell Membrane
HIV
Placenta
HIV-1
Clone Cells
Cell Culture Techniques
Staining and Labeling
Viruses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Virology

Cite this

Kinetics of HIV infection of human placental syncytiotrophoblast cultures : An ultrastructural and immunocytochemical study. / Fazely, F.; Fry, G. N.; Thirkill, T. L.; Hakim, H.; King, B. F.; Douglas, Gordon C.

In: AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, Vol. 11, No. 9, 1995, p. 1023-1030.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{06db485ea09442dc8f95eee8116e051a,
title = "Kinetics of HIV infection of human placental syncytiotrophoblast cultures: An ultrastructural and immunocytochemical study",
abstract = "We previously demonstrated that syncytiotrophoblast (ST) cells from term human placentas could be infected when cocultured with HIV-infected lymphocytic cells. Here, we have used fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy to examine the kinetics of this infection process. Molt-4 clone 8 cells infected with HIV-1(Lai) or filtered supernatant from these cultures were incubated with ST cells for different times. In cell-associated infection, immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that some ST colonies were positive for HIV core proteins (p24,p55) after 1 hr. The number of positive colonies and the intensity of the ST-associated fluorescence increased with time. Transmission electron microscopy showed viral particles with HIV morphology associated with the ST cell surface at 1 hr. Immature virions with budding morphology were observed at 2 hr. In cell- free infection, positive p24,p55 staining was first detected in a few ST colonies at 4 hr. The number of positive colonies increased with time. At 24 hr, the fluorescence pattern and intensity resembled that seen with cell- mediated infection at 4 hr. Transmission electron microscopy revealed an increasing number of viral particles associated with the ST cell plasma membrane with respect to time, and budding virions first appeared at 8 hr. These results demonstrate that HIV infection of placental ST cells proceeds very rapidly in culture and that, furthermore, cell-associated infection of ST is much more efficient than the infection with cell-free virus.",
author = "F. Fazely and Fry, {G. N.} and Thirkill, {T. L.} and H. Hakim and King, {B. F.} and Douglas, {Gordon C}",
year = "1995",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "11",
pages = "1023--1030",
journal = "AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses",
issn = "0889-2229",
publisher = "Mary Ann Liebert Inc.",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Kinetics of HIV infection of human placental syncytiotrophoblast cultures

T2 - An ultrastructural and immunocytochemical study

AU - Fazely, F.

AU - Fry, G. N.

AU - Thirkill, T. L.

AU - Hakim, H.

AU - King, B. F.

AU - Douglas, Gordon C

PY - 1995

Y1 - 1995

N2 - We previously demonstrated that syncytiotrophoblast (ST) cells from term human placentas could be infected when cocultured with HIV-infected lymphocytic cells. Here, we have used fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy to examine the kinetics of this infection process. Molt-4 clone 8 cells infected with HIV-1(Lai) or filtered supernatant from these cultures were incubated with ST cells for different times. In cell-associated infection, immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that some ST colonies were positive for HIV core proteins (p24,p55) after 1 hr. The number of positive colonies and the intensity of the ST-associated fluorescence increased with time. Transmission electron microscopy showed viral particles with HIV morphology associated with the ST cell surface at 1 hr. Immature virions with budding morphology were observed at 2 hr. In cell- free infection, positive p24,p55 staining was first detected in a few ST colonies at 4 hr. The number of positive colonies increased with time. At 24 hr, the fluorescence pattern and intensity resembled that seen with cell- mediated infection at 4 hr. Transmission electron microscopy revealed an increasing number of viral particles associated with the ST cell plasma membrane with respect to time, and budding virions first appeared at 8 hr. These results demonstrate that HIV infection of placental ST cells proceeds very rapidly in culture and that, furthermore, cell-associated infection of ST is much more efficient than the infection with cell-free virus.

AB - We previously demonstrated that syncytiotrophoblast (ST) cells from term human placentas could be infected when cocultured with HIV-infected lymphocytic cells. Here, we have used fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy to examine the kinetics of this infection process. Molt-4 clone 8 cells infected with HIV-1(Lai) or filtered supernatant from these cultures were incubated with ST cells for different times. In cell-associated infection, immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that some ST colonies were positive for HIV core proteins (p24,p55) after 1 hr. The number of positive colonies and the intensity of the ST-associated fluorescence increased with time. Transmission electron microscopy showed viral particles with HIV morphology associated with the ST cell surface at 1 hr. Immature virions with budding morphology were observed at 2 hr. In cell- free infection, positive p24,p55 staining was first detected in a few ST colonies at 4 hr. The number of positive colonies increased with time. At 24 hr, the fluorescence pattern and intensity resembled that seen with cell- mediated infection at 4 hr. Transmission electron microscopy revealed an increasing number of viral particles associated with the ST cell plasma membrane with respect to time, and budding virions first appeared at 8 hr. These results demonstrate that HIV infection of placental ST cells proceeds very rapidly in culture and that, furthermore, cell-associated infection of ST is much more efficient than the infection with cell-free virus.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0029098679&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0029098679&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 8554899

AN - SCOPUS:0029098679

VL - 11

SP - 1023

EP - 1030

JO - AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses

JF - AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses

SN - 0889-2229

IS - 9

ER -