Kinesin is associated with a nonmicrotubule component of sea urchin mitotic spindles.

R. J. Leslie, R. B. Hird, L. Wilson, J. R. McIntosh, J. M. Scholey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sea urchin embryos in second division have been lysed into microtubule-stabilizing buffers to yield mitotic cytoskeletons (MCSs) that consist of two mitotic spindles surrounded by a cortical array of filaments. Microtubules have been completely extracted from MCSs by incubation at 0 degrees C with Ca2+-containing buffer. An antibody to the microtubule translocator kinesin stains the spindles in MCSs and in MCSs treated with 5 mM ATP and also stains spindle-remnants of the MCSs after the microtubules have been extracted. We conclude that kinesin binds to a nonmicrotubule component in the mitotic spindle. Based on these results, we present several models of kinesin function in the spindle.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2771-2775
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume84
Issue number9
StatePublished - May 1987
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General
  • Genetics

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