Kinesin-1 and cytoplasmic dynein act sequentially to move the meiotic spindle to the oocyte cortex in Caenorhabditis elegans

Marina L. Ellefson, Francis J. McNally

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During female meiosis in animals, the meiotic spindle is attached to the egg cortex by one pole during anaphase to allow selective disposal of half the chromosomes in a polar body. In Caenorhabditis elegans, this anaphase spindle position is achieved sequentially through kinesin-1-dependent early translocation followed by anaphase-promoting complex (APC)-dependent spindle rotation. Partial depletion of cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain by RNA interference blocked spindle rotation without affecting early translocation. Dynein depletion also blocked the APC-dependent late translocation that occurs in kinesin-1-depleted embryos. Time-lapse imaging of green fluorescent protein-tagged dynein heavy chain as well as immunofluorescence with dynein-specific antibodies revealed that dynein starts to accumulate at spindle poles just before the initiation of rotation or late translocation. Accumulation of dynein at poles was kinesin-1 independent and APC dependent, just like dynein driven spindle movements. This represents a case of kinesin-1/dynein coordination in which these two motors of opposite polarity act sequentially and independently on a cargo to move it in the same direction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2722-2730
Number of pages9
JournalMolecular Biology of the Cell
Volume20
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2009

Fingerprint

Cytoplasmic Dyneins
Dyneins
Kinesin
Spindle Apparatus
Caenorhabditis elegans
Oocytes
Anaphase-Promoting Complex-Cyclosome
Anaphase
Time-Lapse Imaging
Spindle Poles
Polar Bodies
Meiosis
RNA Interference
Green Fluorescent Proteins
Fluorescent Antibody Technique
Ovum
Embryonic Structures
Chromosomes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Kinesin-1 and cytoplasmic dynein act sequentially to move the meiotic spindle to the oocyte cortex in Caenorhabditis elegans. / Ellefson, Marina L.; McNally, Francis J.

In: Molecular Biology of the Cell, Vol. 20, No. 11, 01.06.2009, p. 2722-2730.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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