Kinematic activity of gray wolf (Canis lupus) sperm in different extenders, added before or after centrifugation

Bruce W Christensen, Cheryl S. Asa, Chong Wang, Karen Bauman, Mary K. Agnew, Steven P. Lorton, Margaret Callahan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

We evaluated two approaches to improving in vitro wolf sperm survival. Both approaches aimed to reduce the exposure of sperm to prostatic fluid resulting from electroejaculation: (1) use of extender formulations recently developed for the domestic dog (the most closely related domestic species); and (2) dilution of ejaculate shortly after semen collection. Three commercial extenders were compared with the TRIS-based extender we had previously used. We also compared the effects on motility of adding extender immediately after collection to our previous protocol in which extender was added after centrifugation. Both subjective and objective (computer-assisted semen analysis program) kinematic measurements were made. Relatively minor differences were noted (and not in total or progressive motility) between the centrifugation protocols. Two of the commercial extenders resulted in significant improvement in motility over the TRIS-based extender and one of the other commercial extenders at 8 hours after collection (mean ± SEM; total motility was 68.3 ± 4.0% and 70.0 ± 4.0% compared with 53.3 ± 4.0% and 55.0 ± 4.0%, respectively; progressive motility 58.6 ± 5.4% and 57.1 ± 5.4% compared with 32.8 ± 5.4% and 39.3 ± 5.4%; P < 0.05). We inferred that components in two of the commercial dog extenders might provide more protection for wolf sperm, prolonging their motility.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)953-960
Number of pages8
JournalTheriogenology
Volume79
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Canis lupus
kinematics
Centrifugation
Biomechanical Phenomena
centrifugation
Spermatozoa
spermatozoa
wolves
semen
Dogs
Semen Analysis
dogs
Semen

Keywords

  • Semen analysis
  • Sperm storage
  • Wolf

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Equine
  • Food Animals
  • Small Animals

Cite this

Kinematic activity of gray wolf (Canis lupus) sperm in different extenders, added before or after centrifugation. / Christensen, Bruce W; Asa, Cheryl S.; Wang, Chong; Bauman, Karen; Agnew, Mary K.; Lorton, Steven P.; Callahan, Margaret.

In: Theriogenology, Vol. 79, No. 6, 01.04.2013, p. 953-960.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Christensen, Bruce W ; Asa, Cheryl S. ; Wang, Chong ; Bauman, Karen ; Agnew, Mary K. ; Lorton, Steven P. ; Callahan, Margaret. / Kinematic activity of gray wolf (Canis lupus) sperm in different extenders, added before or after centrifugation. In: Theriogenology. 2013 ; Vol. 79, No. 6. pp. 953-960.
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