Isolation and characterization of canine placenta-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for the treatment of neurological disorders in dogs

Connor Long, Lee Lankford, Priyadarsini Kumar, Robert A Grahn, Dori L Borjesson, Diana L Farmer, Aijun Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating disorder that affects humans and dogs. The prognosis of SCI depends on the severity of the injury and can include varying levels of motor and sensory deficits including devastating paraplegia and quadriplegia. Placental mesenchymal stromal cells (PMSCs) have been shown to improve wound healing and possess neuroprotective and immunomodulatory capabilities, but have not yet been clinically tested for the treatment of SCI. This study established a protocol to isolate fetal PMSCs from canine placentas and characterized their paracrine secretion profile and ability to stimulate neurons in vitro to assess their potential as a treatment option for neurological disorders in dogs. Canine PMSCs (cPMSCs) were plastic adherent and capable of trilineage differentiation. cPMSCs expressed typical MSC markers and did not express hematopoietic or endothelial cell markers. Genotyping of cPMSCs revealed fetal rather than maternal origin of the cells. cPMSCs were viable and mitotically expansive in a collagen hydrogel delivery vehicle, and they secreted the immunomodulatory and neurotrophic paracrine factors interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). cPMSCs also stimulated the growth of complex neural networks when co-cultured with SH-SY5Y cells, a neuroblastoma cell line used to model neuron growth in vitro. cPMSCs are analogous to human PMSCs. They meet the criteria to be defined as MSCs and represent a potential regenerative therapy option for neurological disorders in dogs with their robust growth in collagen hydrogel, stimulation of neural network formation, and secretion of potent paracrine factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCytometry Part A
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

Fingerprint

Nervous System Diseases
Mesenchymal Stromal Cells
Placenta
Canidae
Dogs
Spinal Cord Injuries
Hydrogel
Collagen
Growth
Neurons
Quadriplegia
Chemokine CCL2
Paraplegia
Nerve Growth Factors
Neuroblastoma
Interleukin-8
Wound Healing
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
Plastics
Interleukin-6

Keywords

  • Canine model
  • Mesenchymal stromal cells
  • Placenta
  • Spinal cord injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Histology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

@article{dac4fca4fe1e4140a06c4ced82f66305,
title = "Isolation and characterization of canine placenta-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for the treatment of neurological disorders in dogs",
abstract = "Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating disorder that affects humans and dogs. The prognosis of SCI depends on the severity of the injury and can include varying levels of motor and sensory deficits including devastating paraplegia and quadriplegia. Placental mesenchymal stromal cells (PMSCs) have been shown to improve wound healing and possess neuroprotective and immunomodulatory capabilities, but have not yet been clinically tested for the treatment of SCI. This study established a protocol to isolate fetal PMSCs from canine placentas and characterized their paracrine secretion profile and ability to stimulate neurons in vitro to assess their potential as a treatment option for neurological disorders in dogs. Canine PMSCs (cPMSCs) were plastic adherent and capable of trilineage differentiation. cPMSCs expressed typical MSC markers and did not express hematopoietic or endothelial cell markers. Genotyping of cPMSCs revealed fetal rather than maternal origin of the cells. cPMSCs were viable and mitotically expansive in a collagen hydrogel delivery vehicle, and they secreted the immunomodulatory and neurotrophic paracrine factors interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). cPMSCs also stimulated the growth of complex neural networks when co-cultured with SH-SY5Y cells, a neuroblastoma cell line used to model neuron growth in vitro. cPMSCs are analogous to human PMSCs. They meet the criteria to be defined as MSCs and represent a potential regenerative therapy option for neurological disorders in dogs with their robust growth in collagen hydrogel, stimulation of neural network formation, and secretion of potent paracrine factors.",
keywords = "Canine model, Mesenchymal stromal cells, Placenta, Spinal cord injury",
author = "Connor Long and Lee Lankford and Priyadarsini Kumar and Grahn, {Robert A} and Borjesson, {Dori L} and Farmer, {Diana L} and Aijun Wang",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1002/cyto.a.23171",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Cytometry. Part A : the journal of the International Society for Analytical Cytology",
issn = "1552-4922",
publisher = "Wiley-Liss Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Isolation and characterization of canine placenta-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for the treatment of neurological disorders in dogs

AU - Long, Connor

AU - Lankford, Lee

AU - Kumar, Priyadarsini

AU - Grahn, Robert A

AU - Borjesson, Dori L

AU - Farmer, Diana L

AU - Wang, Aijun

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating disorder that affects humans and dogs. The prognosis of SCI depends on the severity of the injury and can include varying levels of motor and sensory deficits including devastating paraplegia and quadriplegia. Placental mesenchymal stromal cells (PMSCs) have been shown to improve wound healing and possess neuroprotective and immunomodulatory capabilities, but have not yet been clinically tested for the treatment of SCI. This study established a protocol to isolate fetal PMSCs from canine placentas and characterized their paracrine secretion profile and ability to stimulate neurons in vitro to assess their potential as a treatment option for neurological disorders in dogs. Canine PMSCs (cPMSCs) were plastic adherent and capable of trilineage differentiation. cPMSCs expressed typical MSC markers and did not express hematopoietic or endothelial cell markers. Genotyping of cPMSCs revealed fetal rather than maternal origin of the cells. cPMSCs were viable and mitotically expansive in a collagen hydrogel delivery vehicle, and they secreted the immunomodulatory and neurotrophic paracrine factors interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). cPMSCs also stimulated the growth of complex neural networks when co-cultured with SH-SY5Y cells, a neuroblastoma cell line used to model neuron growth in vitro. cPMSCs are analogous to human PMSCs. They meet the criteria to be defined as MSCs and represent a potential regenerative therapy option for neurological disorders in dogs with their robust growth in collagen hydrogel, stimulation of neural network formation, and secretion of potent paracrine factors.

AB - Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating disorder that affects humans and dogs. The prognosis of SCI depends on the severity of the injury and can include varying levels of motor and sensory deficits including devastating paraplegia and quadriplegia. Placental mesenchymal stromal cells (PMSCs) have been shown to improve wound healing and possess neuroprotective and immunomodulatory capabilities, but have not yet been clinically tested for the treatment of SCI. This study established a protocol to isolate fetal PMSCs from canine placentas and characterized their paracrine secretion profile and ability to stimulate neurons in vitro to assess their potential as a treatment option for neurological disorders in dogs. Canine PMSCs (cPMSCs) were plastic adherent and capable of trilineage differentiation. cPMSCs expressed typical MSC markers and did not express hematopoietic or endothelial cell markers. Genotyping of cPMSCs revealed fetal rather than maternal origin of the cells. cPMSCs were viable and mitotically expansive in a collagen hydrogel delivery vehicle, and they secreted the immunomodulatory and neurotrophic paracrine factors interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). cPMSCs also stimulated the growth of complex neural networks when co-cultured with SH-SY5Y cells, a neuroblastoma cell line used to model neuron growth in vitro. cPMSCs are analogous to human PMSCs. They meet the criteria to be defined as MSCs and represent a potential regenerative therapy option for neurological disorders in dogs with their robust growth in collagen hydrogel, stimulation of neural network formation, and secretion of potent paracrine factors.

KW - Canine model

KW - Mesenchymal stromal cells

KW - Placenta

KW - Spinal cord injury

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85024399888&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85024399888&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/cyto.a.23171

DO - 10.1002/cyto.a.23171

M3 - Article

C2 - 28715613

AN - SCOPUS:85024399888

JO - Cytometry. Part A : the journal of the International Society for Analytical Cytology

JF - Cytometry. Part A : the journal of the International Society for Analytical Cytology

SN - 1552-4922

ER -