Isoflurane depression of spinal nociceptive processing and minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration are not attenuated in mice expressing isoflurane resistant γ-aminobutyric acid type-A receptors

JongBun Kim, Richard Atherley, David F. Werner, Gregg E. Homanics, Earl Carstens, Joseph F. Antognini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Anesthetics produce immobility and depress spinal nociceptive processing, but the exact sites and mechanisms of anesthetic action are unknown. The gamma-aminobutyric acid type-A (GABAA) receptor is thought to be important to anesthetic action. We studied knock-in mice that had mutations in the alpha1 subunit of the GABAA receptor that imparts resistance to isoflurane in in vitro systems. We determined the isoflurane minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) that produces immobility in 50% of subjects and responses of lumbar neurons (single-unit recordings) to noxious stimulation (5 s pinch) of the hindpaw. Isoflurane MAC did not differ between wild-type (1.1 ± 0.1%) and knock-in (1.1 ± 0.1%) mice. Isoflurane depressed neuronal responses to noxious stimulation (60 s period during and after pinch) similarly in both wild-type and knock-in mice (555 ± 133 and 636 ± 106 impulses/min, respectively, at 0.8 MAC and 374 ± 81 and 409 ± 85 impulses/min at 1.2 MAC). We conclude that isoflurane enhancement of alpha1-containing GABAA receptors is not required to produce immobility or depress spinal nociceptive processing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)209-212
Number of pages4
JournalNeuroscience Letters
Volume420
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 15 2007

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Aminobutyrates
Isoflurane
Anesthetics
GABA Receptors
Neurons
Mutation

Keywords

  • Anesthesia
  • GABA receptor
  • Immobility
  • Isoflurane
  • Spinal cord

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Isoflurane depression of spinal nociceptive processing and minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration are not attenuated in mice expressing isoflurane resistant γ-aminobutyric acid type-A receptors. / Kim, JongBun; Atherley, Richard; Werner, David F.; Homanics, Gregg E.; Carstens, Earl; Antognini, Joseph F.

In: Neuroscience Letters, Vol. 420, No. 3, 15.06.2007, p. 209-212.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kim, JongBun ; Atherley, Richard ; Werner, David F. ; Homanics, Gregg E. ; Carstens, Earl ; Antognini, Joseph F. / Isoflurane depression of spinal nociceptive processing and minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration are not attenuated in mice expressing isoflurane resistant γ-aminobutyric acid type-A receptors. In: Neuroscience Letters. 2007 ; Vol. 420, No. 3. pp. 209-212.
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