Is residents' progress on individualized learning plans related to the type of learning goal set?

Su-Ting Terry Li, Debora A Paterniti, Daniel J Tancredi, John Patrick T Co, Daniel C. West

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11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: To determine the types of learning goals residents select for their individualized learning plans (ILPs) and the relationship between goal type and progress toward achieving that goal. METHOD: Pediatric and combined pediatric residents at 46 U.S. training programs completed a Web-based survey on ILPs in 2008-2009, describing their most important learning goal and the goals on which they made the most and least progress. Using iterative inductive review, responses were categorized into seven types (six corresponding with the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education general competencies). Descriptive statistics and regression models were used to assess the relationship between goal type and progress made. RESULTS: Of 1,739 eligible residents, 992 (57%) completed the survey; 668 (38%) had previously completed an ILP and described their learning goals. Residents were more likely to report medical knowledge (MK) (53.7%) and patient care (PC) (25.9%) goals as most important and less likely to report professionalism (1.5%) and systems-based practice (SBP) (1.0%) goals as most important. Compared with progress on MK goals, residents reported significantly greater progress on PC (odds ratio [OR]: 2.20; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.57-3.09) and practice-based learning and improvement teaching (OR: 2.99; 95% CI: 1.59-5.63) goals and less progress on SBP goals (OR: 0.16; 95% CI: 0.05-0.56). CONCLUSIONS: Residents most commonly identified MK and PC learning goals as the most important. Residents made more progress on goals related to everyday tasks, such as PC and teaching, compared with goals less integrated in everyday training, such as SBP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1293-1299
Number of pages7
JournalAcademic Medicine
Volume86
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2011

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Learning
resident
patient care
learning
confidence
Patient Care
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
general education
Teaching
descriptive statistics
accreditation
training program
Pediatrics
graduate
Graduate Medical Education
regression
Accreditation
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Education

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Is residents' progress on individualized learning plans related to the type of learning goal set? / Li, Su-Ting Terry; Paterniti, Debora A; Tancredi, Daniel J; Co, John Patrick T; West, Daniel C.

In: Academic Medicine, Vol. 86, No. 10, 10.2011, p. 1293-1299.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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