Iron in ferritin or in salts (ferrous sulfate) is equally bioavailable in nonanemic women

Penni Davila-Hicks, Elizabeth C. Theil, Bo Lönnerdal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

70 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Recent studies in humans suggest that ferritin iron in soybeans has high bioavailability. However, direct evidence for this is lacking because the soybeans were intrinsically labeled; thus, iron bound to other ligands, such as phytate, was also labeled. Objective: The objectives of the study were to evaluate the absorption of iron from extrinsically labeled, purified ferritin (horse spleen) reconstituted with either high-phosphate iron mineral (plant-type) or low-phosphate iron mineral (animal-type) and to compare it with iron absorption from ferrous sulfate. Design: Nonanemic, healthy young women were fed a standard breakfast meal supplemented with 59Fe-labeled ferritin or ferrous sulfate, in randomized order. Fifteen subjects received ferritin with the low-phosphate iron mineral, and 15 subjects received ferritin with the high-phosphate iron mineral. Iron absorption was measured in a whole-body counter after 14 and 28 d and by red blood cell incorporation after 28 d. Results: There was no significant difference in iron absorption between ferritin and ferrous sulfate: low-phosphate iron mineral ferritin (x- ± SD: 21.4 ± 14.7%) compared with ferrous sulfate (21.9 ± 14.6%), or high-phosphate iron mineral ferritin (22.2 ± 19.2%) compared with ferrous sulfate (16.7 ± 7.1%). Results obtained by using whole-body retention of iron and red blood cell incorporation differed with the type of iron, which suggests that pathways for iron uptake and utilization differed for the 2 forms. Conclusions: Iron is equally well absorbed from ferritin and ferrous sulfate independent of the phosphate content of the ferritin iron mineral. Thus, dietary ferritin iron is likely to be a good source of iron.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)936-940
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume80
Issue number4
StatePublished - Oct 2004

Fingerprint

ferrous sulfate
ferritin
Ferritins
iron phosphates
Iron
Salts
iron
salts
iron absorption
minerals
Minerals
Phosphates
erythrocytes
soybeans

Keywords

  • Ferritin
  • Ferritin iron
  • Iron
  • Iron absorption
  • Iron bioavailability
  • Iron mineral ferritin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Iron in ferritin or in salts (ferrous sulfate) is equally bioavailable in nonanemic women. / Davila-Hicks, Penni; Theil, Elizabeth C.; Lönnerdal, Bo.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 80, No. 4, 10.2004, p. 936-940.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Davila-Hicks, Penni ; Theil, Elizabeth C. ; Lönnerdal, Bo. / Iron in ferritin or in salts (ferrous sulfate) is equally bioavailable in nonanemic women. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2004 ; Vol. 80, No. 4. pp. 936-940.
@article{d4296bd173dc4b4cbe1e13c2cbf65f7b,
title = "Iron in ferritin or in salts (ferrous sulfate) is equally bioavailable in nonanemic women",
abstract = "Background: Recent studies in humans suggest that ferritin iron in soybeans has high bioavailability. However, direct evidence for this is lacking because the soybeans were intrinsically labeled; thus, iron bound to other ligands, such as phytate, was also labeled. Objective: The objectives of the study were to evaluate the absorption of iron from extrinsically labeled, purified ferritin (horse spleen) reconstituted with either high-phosphate iron mineral (plant-type) or low-phosphate iron mineral (animal-type) and to compare it with iron absorption from ferrous sulfate. Design: Nonanemic, healthy young women were fed a standard breakfast meal supplemented with 59Fe-labeled ferritin or ferrous sulfate, in randomized order. Fifteen subjects received ferritin with the low-phosphate iron mineral, and 15 subjects received ferritin with the high-phosphate iron mineral. Iron absorption was measured in a whole-body counter after 14 and 28 d and by red blood cell incorporation after 28 d. Results: There was no significant difference in iron absorption between ferritin and ferrous sulfate: low-phosphate iron mineral ferritin (x- ± SD: 21.4 ± 14.7{\%}) compared with ferrous sulfate (21.9 ± 14.6{\%}), or high-phosphate iron mineral ferritin (22.2 ± 19.2{\%}) compared with ferrous sulfate (16.7 ± 7.1{\%}). Results obtained by using whole-body retention of iron and red blood cell incorporation differed with the type of iron, which suggests that pathways for iron uptake and utilization differed for the 2 forms. Conclusions: Iron is equally well absorbed from ferritin and ferrous sulfate independent of the phosphate content of the ferritin iron mineral. Thus, dietary ferritin iron is likely to be a good source of iron.",
keywords = "Ferritin, Ferritin iron, Iron, Iron absorption, Iron bioavailability, Iron mineral ferritin",
author = "Penni Davila-Hicks and Theil, {Elizabeth C.} and Bo L{\"o}nnerdal",
year = "2004",
month = "10",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "80",
pages = "936--940",
journal = "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition",
issn = "0002-9165",
publisher = "American Society for Nutrition",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Iron in ferritin or in salts (ferrous sulfate) is equally bioavailable in nonanemic women

AU - Davila-Hicks, Penni

AU - Theil, Elizabeth C.

AU - Lönnerdal, Bo

PY - 2004/10

Y1 - 2004/10

N2 - Background: Recent studies in humans suggest that ferritin iron in soybeans has high bioavailability. However, direct evidence for this is lacking because the soybeans were intrinsically labeled; thus, iron bound to other ligands, such as phytate, was also labeled. Objective: The objectives of the study were to evaluate the absorption of iron from extrinsically labeled, purified ferritin (horse spleen) reconstituted with either high-phosphate iron mineral (plant-type) or low-phosphate iron mineral (animal-type) and to compare it with iron absorption from ferrous sulfate. Design: Nonanemic, healthy young women were fed a standard breakfast meal supplemented with 59Fe-labeled ferritin or ferrous sulfate, in randomized order. Fifteen subjects received ferritin with the low-phosphate iron mineral, and 15 subjects received ferritin with the high-phosphate iron mineral. Iron absorption was measured in a whole-body counter after 14 and 28 d and by red blood cell incorporation after 28 d. Results: There was no significant difference in iron absorption between ferritin and ferrous sulfate: low-phosphate iron mineral ferritin (x- ± SD: 21.4 ± 14.7%) compared with ferrous sulfate (21.9 ± 14.6%), or high-phosphate iron mineral ferritin (22.2 ± 19.2%) compared with ferrous sulfate (16.7 ± 7.1%). Results obtained by using whole-body retention of iron and red blood cell incorporation differed with the type of iron, which suggests that pathways for iron uptake and utilization differed for the 2 forms. Conclusions: Iron is equally well absorbed from ferritin and ferrous sulfate independent of the phosphate content of the ferritin iron mineral. Thus, dietary ferritin iron is likely to be a good source of iron.

AB - Background: Recent studies in humans suggest that ferritin iron in soybeans has high bioavailability. However, direct evidence for this is lacking because the soybeans were intrinsically labeled; thus, iron bound to other ligands, such as phytate, was also labeled. Objective: The objectives of the study were to evaluate the absorption of iron from extrinsically labeled, purified ferritin (horse spleen) reconstituted with either high-phosphate iron mineral (plant-type) or low-phosphate iron mineral (animal-type) and to compare it with iron absorption from ferrous sulfate. Design: Nonanemic, healthy young women were fed a standard breakfast meal supplemented with 59Fe-labeled ferritin or ferrous sulfate, in randomized order. Fifteen subjects received ferritin with the low-phosphate iron mineral, and 15 subjects received ferritin with the high-phosphate iron mineral. Iron absorption was measured in a whole-body counter after 14 and 28 d and by red blood cell incorporation after 28 d. Results: There was no significant difference in iron absorption between ferritin and ferrous sulfate: low-phosphate iron mineral ferritin (x- ± SD: 21.4 ± 14.7%) compared with ferrous sulfate (21.9 ± 14.6%), or high-phosphate iron mineral ferritin (22.2 ± 19.2%) compared with ferrous sulfate (16.7 ± 7.1%). Results obtained by using whole-body retention of iron and red blood cell incorporation differed with the type of iron, which suggests that pathways for iron uptake and utilization differed for the 2 forms. Conclusions: Iron is equally well absorbed from ferritin and ferrous sulfate independent of the phosphate content of the ferritin iron mineral. Thus, dietary ferritin iron is likely to be a good source of iron.

KW - Ferritin

KW - Ferritin iron

KW - Iron

KW - Iron absorption

KW - Iron bioavailability

KW - Iron mineral ferritin

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=5144224375&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=5144224375&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 15447902

AN - SCOPUS:5144224375

VL - 80

SP - 936

EP - 940

JO - American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

JF - American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

SN - 0002-9165

IS - 4

ER -