Ionized calcium concentration in horses with surgically managed gastrointestinal disease: 147 cases (1988-1990).

A. J. Dart, J. R. Snyder, Sharon Spier, K. E. Sullivan

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Abstract

Packed cell volume, total plasma protein, serum sodium, potassium, and ionized Ca2+ concentrations, and blood pH were determined at the time of admission and following surgery in 147 horses with acute abdominal crisis. Horses were allotted to 3 categories on the basis of the surgical lesion: (1) nonstrangulating obstruction of the ascending or descending colon (category A, n = 76), (2) strangulating and nonstrangulating infarction of the cecum or ascending colon (category B, n = 37), and (3) strangulating and nonstrangulating infarction of the small intestine (category C, n = 25). Horses with low serum ionized Ca2+ concentration following surgery were given 23% calcium gluconate (100 to 300 ml) IV to effect, and ionized Ca2+ concentration was determined following treatment. The serum ionized Ca2+ concentrations of horses in categories A, B, and C before and after surgery were lower than our normal laboratory reference range. Prior to surgery, serum ionized Ca2+ concentration measured from horses in category B and C was lower than that in horses in category A. There was no difference in ionized Ca2+ concentration in serum samples obtained before surgery in horses from category B and C, and in serum samples obtained following surgery. There was a decrease in ionized Ca2+ concentration during surgery in horses in category A. There was no change between preoperative and postoperative ionized Ca2+ concentration in the samples obtained from horses in category B and C. After calcium gluconate administration, all horses with low serum ionized Ca2+ after surgery had concentrations within our normal range. Measurement of serum ionized Ca2+ in horses with an acute abdominal crisis is recommended.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1244-1248
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume201
Issue number8
StatePublished - Oct 15 1992

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Gastrointestinal Diseases
digestive system diseases
Horses
Calcium
calcium
horses
surgery
Serum
Calcium Gluconate
Ascending Colon
infarction
Infarction
colon
Reference Values
Descending Colon
blood pH
Cecum
intestinal obstruction
Cell Size
sampling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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Ionized calcium concentration in horses with surgically managed gastrointestinal disease : 147 cases (1988-1990). / Dart, A. J.; Snyder, J. R.; Spier, Sharon; Sullivan, K. E.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 201, No. 8, 15.10.1992, p. 1244-1248.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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