Involved field radiation, fractionated total body irradiation, high dose cyclophosphamide, and autologous bone marrow transplantation in the treatment of malignant lymphomas

R. Ghalie, Carol M Richman, S. S. Adler, A. D. Korenblit, T. S. Kramer, S. Manson, A. Dolce, H. Kaizer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We report the results of intensive therapy and autologous bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in 23 patients with malignant lymphoma (eight Hodgkin's disease and 15 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma) who failed primary therapy. All patients had evidence of disease prior to transplant therapy: 10 had never achieved a complete remission and 13 were in relapse. The preparative regimen included involved field radiation followed by fractionated total body irradiation and high dose cyclophosphamide. A complete remission was achieved in 15 patients, 11 of whom continue in unmaintained complete remission from 27 to 72 months after BMT (median follow-up of 52 months). Of the remaining patients, five did not achieve a complete remission and three died of early toxicity. The event-free survival of the entire group is 47%. Disease status at the time of BMT was significantly correlated with patient outcome. The event-free survival of 13 patients in whom there was no objective evidence of tumor growth on conventional dose therapy was 77% compared with only 10% in patients with tumors progressing on conventional dose therapy (p<0.002). All six patients transplanted in untreated relapse continue in unmaintained remission, suggesting that debulking chemotherapy may not be necessary before BMT. Alternative approaches are needed in patients whose tumors progress on conventional dose therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)41-45
Number of pages5
JournalBone Marrow Transplantation
Volume8
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes

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Autologous Transplantation
Whole-Body Irradiation
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Cyclophosphamide
Lymphoma
Radiation
Therapeutics
Disease-Free Survival
Recurrence
Neoplasms
Hodgkin Disease
Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
Transplants
Drug Therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Involved field radiation, fractionated total body irradiation, high dose cyclophosphamide, and autologous bone marrow transplantation in the treatment of malignant lymphomas. / Ghalie, R.; Richman, Carol M; Adler, S. S.; Korenblit, A. D.; Kramer, T. S.; Manson, S.; Dolce, A.; Kaizer, H.

In: Bone Marrow Transplantation, Vol. 8, No. 1, 1991, p. 41-45.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Korenblit, A. D.

AU - Kramer, T. S.

AU - Manson, S.

AU - Dolce, A.

AU - Kaizer, H.

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