Investigation of relationships between urinary biomarkers of phytoestrogens, phthalates, and phenols and pubertal stages in girls

Mary S. Wolff, Susan L. Teitelbaum, Susan M. Pinney, Gayle Windham, Laura Liao, Frank Biro, Lawrence H. Kushi, Chris Erdmann, Robert A. Hiatt, Michael E. Rybak, Antonia M. Calafat

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

175 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Hormonally active environmental agents may alter the course of pubertal development in girls, which is controlled by steroids and gonadotropins. OBJECTIVES: We investigated associations of concurrent exposures from three chemical classes (phenols, phthalates, and phytoestrogens) with pubertal stages in a multiethnic longitudinal study of 1,151 girls from New York City, New York, greater Cincinnati, Ohio, and northern California who were 6-8 years of age at enrollment (2004-2007). METHODS: We measured urinary exposure biomarkers at visit 1 and examined associations with breast and pubic hair development (present or absent, assessed 1 year later) using multivariate adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Modification of biomarker associations by age-specific body mass index percentile (BMI%) was investigated, because adipose tissue is a source of peripubertal hormones. RESULTS: Breast development was present in 30% of girls, and 22% had pubic hair. High-molecular-weight phthalate (high MWP) metabolites were weakly associated with pubic hair development [adjusted PR, 0.94 (95% CI, 0.88-1.00), fifth vs. first quintile]. Small inverse associations were seen for daidzein with breast stage and for triclosan and high MWP with pubic hair stage; a positive trend was observed for low-molecular-weight phthalate biomarkers with breast and pubic hair development. Enterolactone attenuated BMI associations with breast development. In the first enterolac-tone quintile, for the association of high BMI with any development, the PR was 1.34 (95% CI, 1.23-1.45 vs. low BMI). There was no BMI association in the fifth, highest quintile of enterolactone. CONCLUSIONS: Weak hormonally active xenobiotic agents investigated in this study had small associations with pubertal development, mainly among those agents detected at highest concentrations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1039-1046
Number of pages8
JournalEnvironmental Health Perspectives
Volume118
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Phytoestrogens
Phenols
Hair
Breast
Biomarkers
Molecular Weight
Confidence Intervals
Triclosan
Xenobiotics
Gonadotropins
Longitudinal Studies
Adipose Tissue
Body Mass Index
Steroids
phthalic acid
Hormones

Keywords

  • Biomarkers
  • Phenols
  • Phthalates
  • Phytoestrogens
  • Puberty

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Investigation of relationships between urinary biomarkers of phytoestrogens, phthalates, and phenols and pubertal stages in girls. / Wolff, Mary S.; Teitelbaum, Susan L.; Pinney, Susan M.; Windham, Gayle; Liao, Laura; Biro, Frank; Kushi, Lawrence H.; Erdmann, Chris; Hiatt, Robert A.; Rybak, Michael E.; Calafat, Antonia M.

In: Environmental Health Perspectives, Vol. 118, No. 7, 2010, p. 1039-1046.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wolff, MS, Teitelbaum, SL, Pinney, SM, Windham, G, Liao, L, Biro, F, Kushi, LH, Erdmann, C, Hiatt, RA, Rybak, ME & Calafat, AM 2010, 'Investigation of relationships between urinary biomarkers of phytoestrogens, phthalates, and phenols and pubertal stages in girls', Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 118, no. 7, pp. 1039-1046. https://doi.org/10.1289/ehp.0901690
Wolff, Mary S. ; Teitelbaum, Susan L. ; Pinney, Susan M. ; Windham, Gayle ; Liao, Laura ; Biro, Frank ; Kushi, Lawrence H. ; Erdmann, Chris ; Hiatt, Robert A. ; Rybak, Michael E. ; Calafat, Antonia M. / Investigation of relationships between urinary biomarkers of phytoestrogens, phthalates, and phenols and pubertal stages in girls. In: Environmental Health Perspectives. 2010 ; Vol. 118, No. 7. pp. 1039-1046.
@article{dc0b66986e8d4c62baa1351839a62415,
title = "Investigation of relationships between urinary biomarkers of phytoestrogens, phthalates, and phenols and pubertal stages in girls",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Hormonally active environmental agents may alter the course of pubertal development in girls, which is controlled by steroids and gonadotropins. OBJECTIVES: We investigated associations of concurrent exposures from three chemical classes (phenols, phthalates, and phytoestrogens) with pubertal stages in a multiethnic longitudinal study of 1,151 girls from New York City, New York, greater Cincinnati, Ohio, and northern California who were 6-8 years of age at enrollment (2004-2007). METHODS: We measured urinary exposure biomarkers at visit 1 and examined associations with breast and pubic hair development (present or absent, assessed 1 year later) using multivariate adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) and 95{\%} confidence intervals (CIs). Modification of biomarker associations by age-specific body mass index percentile (BMI{\%}) was investigated, because adipose tissue is a source of peripubertal hormones. RESULTS: Breast development was present in 30{\%} of girls, and 22{\%} had pubic hair. High-molecular-weight phthalate (high MWP) metabolites were weakly associated with pubic hair development [adjusted PR, 0.94 (95{\%} CI, 0.88-1.00), fifth vs. first quintile]. Small inverse associations were seen for daidzein with breast stage and for triclosan and high MWP with pubic hair stage; a positive trend was observed for low-molecular-weight phthalate biomarkers with breast and pubic hair development. Enterolactone attenuated BMI associations with breast development. In the first enterolac-tone quintile, for the association of high BMI with any development, the PR was 1.34 (95{\%} CI, 1.23-1.45 vs. low BMI). There was no BMI association in the fifth, highest quintile of enterolactone. CONCLUSIONS: Weak hormonally active xenobiotic agents investigated in this study had small associations with pubertal development, mainly among those agents detected at highest concentrations.",
keywords = "Biomarkers, Phenols, Phthalates, Phytoestrogens, Puberty",
author = "Wolff, {Mary S.} and Teitelbaum, {Susan L.} and Pinney, {Susan M.} and Gayle Windham and Laura Liao and Frank Biro and Kushi, {Lawrence H.} and Chris Erdmann and Hiatt, {Robert A.} and Rybak, {Michael E.} and Calafat, {Antonia M.}",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.1289/ehp.0901690",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "118",
pages = "1039--1046",
journal = "Environmental Health Perspectives",
issn = "0091-6765",
publisher = "Public Health Services, US Dept of Health and Human Services",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Investigation of relationships between urinary biomarkers of phytoestrogens, phthalates, and phenols and pubertal stages in girls

AU - Wolff, Mary S.

AU - Teitelbaum, Susan L.

AU - Pinney, Susan M.

AU - Windham, Gayle

AU - Liao, Laura

AU - Biro, Frank

AU - Kushi, Lawrence H.

AU - Erdmann, Chris

AU - Hiatt, Robert A.

AU - Rybak, Michael E.

AU - Calafat, Antonia M.

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - BACKGROUND: Hormonally active environmental agents may alter the course of pubertal development in girls, which is controlled by steroids and gonadotropins. OBJECTIVES: We investigated associations of concurrent exposures from three chemical classes (phenols, phthalates, and phytoestrogens) with pubertal stages in a multiethnic longitudinal study of 1,151 girls from New York City, New York, greater Cincinnati, Ohio, and northern California who were 6-8 years of age at enrollment (2004-2007). METHODS: We measured urinary exposure biomarkers at visit 1 and examined associations with breast and pubic hair development (present or absent, assessed 1 year later) using multivariate adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Modification of biomarker associations by age-specific body mass index percentile (BMI%) was investigated, because adipose tissue is a source of peripubertal hormones. RESULTS: Breast development was present in 30% of girls, and 22% had pubic hair. High-molecular-weight phthalate (high MWP) metabolites were weakly associated with pubic hair development [adjusted PR, 0.94 (95% CI, 0.88-1.00), fifth vs. first quintile]. Small inverse associations were seen for daidzein with breast stage and for triclosan and high MWP with pubic hair stage; a positive trend was observed for low-molecular-weight phthalate biomarkers with breast and pubic hair development. Enterolactone attenuated BMI associations with breast development. In the first enterolac-tone quintile, for the association of high BMI with any development, the PR was 1.34 (95% CI, 1.23-1.45 vs. low BMI). There was no BMI association in the fifth, highest quintile of enterolactone. CONCLUSIONS: Weak hormonally active xenobiotic agents investigated in this study had small associations with pubertal development, mainly among those agents detected at highest concentrations.

AB - BACKGROUND: Hormonally active environmental agents may alter the course of pubertal development in girls, which is controlled by steroids and gonadotropins. OBJECTIVES: We investigated associations of concurrent exposures from three chemical classes (phenols, phthalates, and phytoestrogens) with pubertal stages in a multiethnic longitudinal study of 1,151 girls from New York City, New York, greater Cincinnati, Ohio, and northern California who were 6-8 years of age at enrollment (2004-2007). METHODS: We measured urinary exposure biomarkers at visit 1 and examined associations with breast and pubic hair development (present or absent, assessed 1 year later) using multivariate adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Modification of biomarker associations by age-specific body mass index percentile (BMI%) was investigated, because adipose tissue is a source of peripubertal hormones. RESULTS: Breast development was present in 30% of girls, and 22% had pubic hair. High-molecular-weight phthalate (high MWP) metabolites were weakly associated with pubic hair development [adjusted PR, 0.94 (95% CI, 0.88-1.00), fifth vs. first quintile]. Small inverse associations were seen for daidzein with breast stage and for triclosan and high MWP with pubic hair stage; a positive trend was observed for low-molecular-weight phthalate biomarkers with breast and pubic hair development. Enterolactone attenuated BMI associations with breast development. In the first enterolac-tone quintile, for the association of high BMI with any development, the PR was 1.34 (95% CI, 1.23-1.45 vs. low BMI). There was no BMI association in the fifth, highest quintile of enterolactone. CONCLUSIONS: Weak hormonally active xenobiotic agents investigated in this study had small associations with pubertal development, mainly among those agents detected at highest concentrations.

KW - Biomarkers

KW - Phenols

KW - Phthalates

KW - Phytoestrogens

KW - Puberty

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77954843646&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77954843646&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1289/ehp.0901690

DO - 10.1289/ehp.0901690

M3 - Article

VL - 118

SP - 1039

EP - 1046

JO - Environmental Health Perspectives

JF - Environmental Health Perspectives

SN - 0091-6765

IS - 7

ER -