Investigation of Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) as a pharmacokinetic model for cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus) and Poicephalus parrots via comparison of the pharmacokinetics of a single intravenous injection of oxytetracycline hydrochloride

A. Osofsky, Lisa A Tell, Philip H Kass, S. E. Wetzlich, J. Nugent-Deal, A. L. Craigmill

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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine whether Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) would serve as a pharmacokinetic animal model for two small companion parrots: cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus) and Poicephalus parrots. Oxytetracycline (OTC) was the pharmacologic agent chosen for this study as it is eliminated primarily by renal glomerular filtration and undergoes minimal metabolism. A single intravenous injection of 20 mg/kg oxytetracycline hydrochloride was administered to the three study groups and blood samples were obtained at 5, 10, 15, and 30 min post-OTC injection as well as 1, 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 h post-OTC injection. Quantification of plasma OTC was accomplished using a standardized microbial inhibition assay. Naive-pooled data (NPD) analysis of the plasma concentration-time profile of OTC best fit a two-compartment open model for all three avian species. Noncompartmental analysis of the mean data yielded the following parameters for quail, cockatiels and Poicephalus parrots respectively: λz = 3.14, 4.57, 3.71 h; AUC = 38.9, 42.7, 49.6 μg·h/mL; and Cl = 514, 468, 403 mL/h/kg. Based on the similarity of these pharmacokinetic parameters, it appears that quail could be used as a model species to predict the appropriate OTC dosing regimen for small psittacine birds. A bootstrap procedure was also applied to these sparse data sets for both compartmental and noncompartmental analysis. The bootstrap procedure allowed for the calculation of variability of parameters; however, the estimates of the parameters were very similar to those calculated using the NPD and the data mean values.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)505-513
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Volume28
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2005

Fingerprint

Cockatoos
Parrots
Coturnix
Oxytetracycline
parrots
oxytetracycline
intravenous injection
Intravenous Injections
pharmacokinetics
Pharmacokinetics
Quail
quails
data analysis
Psittaciformes
injection
Injections
Blood Group Antigens
Coturnix japonica
Poicephalus
Area Under Curve

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

@article{b1a8fa48c92c46bc8802f1411b3efc13,
title = "Investigation of Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) as a pharmacokinetic model for cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus) and Poicephalus parrots via comparison of the pharmacokinetics of a single intravenous injection of oxytetracycline hydrochloride",
abstract = "The purpose of this study was to determine whether Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) would serve as a pharmacokinetic animal model for two small companion parrots: cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus) and Poicephalus parrots. Oxytetracycline (OTC) was the pharmacologic agent chosen for this study as it is eliminated primarily by renal glomerular filtration and undergoes minimal metabolism. A single intravenous injection of 20 mg/kg oxytetracycline hydrochloride was administered to the three study groups and blood samples were obtained at 5, 10, 15, and 30 min post-OTC injection as well as 1, 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 h post-OTC injection. Quantification of plasma OTC was accomplished using a standardized microbial inhibition assay. Naive-pooled data (NPD) analysis of the plasma concentration-time profile of OTC best fit a two-compartment open model for all three avian species. Noncompartmental analysis of the mean data yielded the following parameters for quail, cockatiels and Poicephalus parrots respectively: λz = 3.14, 4.57, 3.71 h; AUC = 38.9, 42.7, 49.6 μg·h/mL; and Cl = 514, 468, 403 mL/h/kg. Based on the similarity of these pharmacokinetic parameters, it appears that quail could be used as a model species to predict the appropriate OTC dosing regimen for small psittacine birds. A bootstrap procedure was also applied to these sparse data sets for both compartmental and noncompartmental analysis. The bootstrap procedure allowed for the calculation of variability of parameters; however, the estimates of the parameters were very similar to those calculated using the NPD and the data mean values.",
author = "A. Osofsky and Tell, {Lisa A} and Kass, {Philip H} and Wetzlich, {S. E.} and J. Nugent-Deal and Craigmill, {A. L.}",
year = "2005",
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doi = "10.1111/j.1365-2885.2005.00694.x",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Investigation of Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) as a pharmacokinetic model for cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus) and Poicephalus parrots via comparison of the pharmacokinetics of a single intravenous injection of oxytetracycline hydrochloride

AU - Osofsky, A.

AU - Tell, Lisa A

AU - Kass, Philip H

AU - Wetzlich, S. E.

AU - Nugent-Deal, J.

AU - Craigmill, A. L.

PY - 2005/12

Y1 - 2005/12

N2 - The purpose of this study was to determine whether Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) would serve as a pharmacokinetic animal model for two small companion parrots: cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus) and Poicephalus parrots. Oxytetracycline (OTC) was the pharmacologic agent chosen for this study as it is eliminated primarily by renal glomerular filtration and undergoes minimal metabolism. A single intravenous injection of 20 mg/kg oxytetracycline hydrochloride was administered to the three study groups and blood samples were obtained at 5, 10, 15, and 30 min post-OTC injection as well as 1, 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 h post-OTC injection. Quantification of plasma OTC was accomplished using a standardized microbial inhibition assay. Naive-pooled data (NPD) analysis of the plasma concentration-time profile of OTC best fit a two-compartment open model for all three avian species. Noncompartmental analysis of the mean data yielded the following parameters for quail, cockatiels and Poicephalus parrots respectively: λz = 3.14, 4.57, 3.71 h; AUC = 38.9, 42.7, 49.6 μg·h/mL; and Cl = 514, 468, 403 mL/h/kg. Based on the similarity of these pharmacokinetic parameters, it appears that quail could be used as a model species to predict the appropriate OTC dosing regimen for small psittacine birds. A bootstrap procedure was also applied to these sparse data sets for both compartmental and noncompartmental analysis. The bootstrap procedure allowed for the calculation of variability of parameters; however, the estimates of the parameters were very similar to those calculated using the NPD and the data mean values.

AB - The purpose of this study was to determine whether Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) would serve as a pharmacokinetic animal model for two small companion parrots: cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus) and Poicephalus parrots. Oxytetracycline (OTC) was the pharmacologic agent chosen for this study as it is eliminated primarily by renal glomerular filtration and undergoes minimal metabolism. A single intravenous injection of 20 mg/kg oxytetracycline hydrochloride was administered to the three study groups and blood samples were obtained at 5, 10, 15, and 30 min post-OTC injection as well as 1, 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 h post-OTC injection. Quantification of plasma OTC was accomplished using a standardized microbial inhibition assay. Naive-pooled data (NPD) analysis of the plasma concentration-time profile of OTC best fit a two-compartment open model for all three avian species. Noncompartmental analysis of the mean data yielded the following parameters for quail, cockatiels and Poicephalus parrots respectively: λz = 3.14, 4.57, 3.71 h; AUC = 38.9, 42.7, 49.6 μg·h/mL; and Cl = 514, 468, 403 mL/h/kg. Based on the similarity of these pharmacokinetic parameters, it appears that quail could be used as a model species to predict the appropriate OTC dosing regimen for small psittacine birds. A bootstrap procedure was also applied to these sparse data sets for both compartmental and noncompartmental analysis. The bootstrap procedure allowed for the calculation of variability of parameters; however, the estimates of the parameters were very similar to those calculated using the NPD and the data mean values.

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