Intrauterine growth retarded infants. Correlation of gestational age with maternal factors, mode of delivery, and perinatal survival

C. P. Perry, R. E. Harris, R. A. DeLemos, Donald Null

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fifty eight infants of 3332 deliveries (1.7%) were found to be growth retarded (IGR) at birth. For purposes of analysis, the infants were divided into 2 groups according to gestational age at delivery: Group I infants were delivered between 38 and 43 weeks' gestation, and Group II infants were delivered between 28 and 37 weeks'. The infants at greatest risk are those who manifest chronic intrauterine fetal distress associated with prematurity. Asphyxia was evident in 9 of 19 infants (47%) in Group II as compared to 9 of 36 infants (25%) in Group I. The premature IGR infants delivered by low forceps and cesarean section had higher 1 and 5 minute Apgar scores than those delivered spontaneously. There was a five fold increase of intrauterine demise and a two fold increase of neonatal deaths in Group II IGR infants as compared to the non IGR premature infants. In the management of IGR, a combined obstetric pediatric approach is important. A higher index of suspicion, appropriate evaluation, earlier diagnosis, and expedient delivery are essential if the prognosis for an IGR infant is to be improved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)182-186
Number of pages5
JournalObstetrics and Gynecology
Volume48
Issue number2
StatePublished - Dec 1 1976
Externally publishedYes

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Gestational Age
Mothers
Growth
Premature Infants
Fetal Distress
Apgar Score
Asphyxia
Surgical Instruments
Cesarean Section
Obstetrics
Early Diagnosis
Parturition
Pediatrics
Pregnancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Intrauterine growth retarded infants. Correlation of gestational age with maternal factors, mode of delivery, and perinatal survival. / Perry, C. P.; Harris, R. E.; DeLemos, R. A.; Null, Donald.

In: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 48, No. 2, 01.12.1976, p. 182-186.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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