Intramural Vascular Edema in the Brain of Goats With Clostridium perfringens Type D Enterotoxemia

Joaquín Ortega, José Manuel Verdes, Eleonora L. Morrell, John W. Finnie, Jim Manavis, Francisco A Uzal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Enterotoxemia caused by Clostridium perfringens type D is an important disease of sheep and goats with a worldwide distribution. Cerebral microangiopathy is considered pathognomonic for ovine enterotoxemia and is seen in most cases of the disorder in sheep. However, these lesions are poorly described in goats. In this article, we describe the vasculocentric brain lesions in 44 cases of caprine spontaneous C. perfringens type D enterotoxemia. Only 1 goat had gross changes in the brain, which consisted of mild cerebellar coning. However, 8 of 44 (18%) cases showed microscopic brain lesions, characterized by intramural vascular proteinaceous edema, a novel and diagnostically significant finding. The precise location of the edema was better observed with periodic acid–Schiff, Gomori’s, and albumin stains. Glial fibrillary acidic protein and aquaporin 4 immunostaining revealed strong immunolabeling of astrocyte foot processes surrounding microvessels. The areas of the brain most frequently affected were the cerebral cortex, corpus striatum (basal ganglia), and cerebellar peduncles, and both arterioles and venules were involved. Most of the goats of this study showed lesions in the intestine (enteritis, colitis, and typhlitis), although pulmonary congestion and edema, hydrothorax, hydropericardium, and ascites were also described. Although the intramural edema described, for the first time, in these caprine cases is useful for the diagnosis of enterotoxemia when observed, its absence cannot exclude the disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)452-459
Number of pages8
JournalVeterinary pathology
Volume56
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Enterotoxemia
Clostridium perfringens D
enterotoxemia
Clostridium perfringens
Brain Edema
blood vessels
Goats
edema
Blood Vessels
lesions (animal)
goats
brain
Edema
Brain
Sheep
Goat Diseases
Typhlitis
Cerebral Small Vessel Diseases
Sheep Diseases
Hydrothorax

Keywords

  • brain
  • Clostridium perfringens type D
  • enterotoxemia
  • goats
  • intramural edema
  • microangiopathy
  • vasculitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Intramural Vascular Edema in the Brain of Goats With Clostridium perfringens Type D Enterotoxemia. / Ortega, Joaquín; Verdes, José Manuel; Morrell, Eleonora L.; Finnie, John W.; Manavis, Jim; Uzal, Francisco A.

In: Veterinary pathology, Vol. 56, No. 3, 01.05.2019, p. 452-459.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ortega, Joaquín ; Verdes, José Manuel ; Morrell, Eleonora L. ; Finnie, John W. ; Manavis, Jim ; Uzal, Francisco A. / Intramural Vascular Edema in the Brain of Goats With Clostridium perfringens Type D Enterotoxemia. In: Veterinary pathology. 2019 ; Vol. 56, No. 3. pp. 452-459.
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