Intraluminal tracheal stenting for treatment of tracheal narrowing in three cats

William T Culp, Chick Weisse, Steven G. Cole, Jeffrey A. Solomon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective-To describe the use of intraluminal tracheal stenting in 3 cats with either benign or malignant tracheal obstruction. Study Design-Retrospective clinical study. Animals-Three client-owned cats. Methods-Medical records were reviewed and information regarding signalment, clinical signs, physical examination findings, diagnostic tests performed, treatment, outcome and follow-up were retrieved. Intraluminal tracheal stent placement was performed as previously described in the literature. Results-Three cats received intraluminal tracheal stents for the treatment of tracheal obstruction due to 3 different underlying causes: stricture secondary to traumatic endotracheal intubation, stricture secondary to a previous tracheotomy, and neoplasia. Self-expanding metallic stents of varying sizes were placed, and all cats recovered uneventfully from the procedures. The cat with tracheal neoplasia was euthanized because of pulmonary metastatic disease 6 weeks post-stent placement. The two cats with tracheal obstructions secondary to benign strictures are currently 39 months and 32 weeks post-stent placement, respectively. No complications were noted during the post-stent period in any of the 3 cats. Conclusions-Intraluminal tracheal stenting was easily, safely, and rapidly performed without complications and resulted in immediate improvement in clinical signs in all three cases. None of the cats in this study developed significant stent-associated complications during the study period. Clinical Relevance-Intraluminal tracheal stenting has the potential to be a viable option for the treatment of tracheal obstruction in cats and perhaps for similar disease processes in other veterinary patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)107-113
Number of pages7
JournalVeterinary Surgery
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Cats
cats
Stents
Pathologic Constriction
Therapeutics
Tracheotomy
neoplasms
Intratracheal Intubation
Routine Diagnostic Tests
clinical examination
diagnostic techniques
respiratory tract diseases
Lung Diseases
Physical Examination
Medical Records
clinical trials
Neoplasms
Retrospective Studies
experimental design
animals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Intraluminal tracheal stenting for treatment of tracheal narrowing in three cats. / Culp, William T; Weisse, Chick; Cole, Steven G.; Solomon, Jeffrey A.

In: Veterinary Surgery, Vol. 36, No. 2, 02.2007, p. 107-113.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Culp, William T ; Weisse, Chick ; Cole, Steven G. ; Solomon, Jeffrey A. / Intraluminal tracheal stenting for treatment of tracheal narrowing in three cats. In: Veterinary Surgery. 2007 ; Vol. 36, No. 2. pp. 107-113.
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