INTRACRANIAL RING ENHANCING LESIONS IN DOGS

A CORRELATIVE CT SCANNING AND NEUROPATHOLOGIC STUDY

Michael Wolf, Vince Pedroia, Robert Higgins, Philip D. Koblik, Jane M. Turrel, Jerry M. Owens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This retrospective analysis of 15 dogs with postcontrast ring enhancing brain lesions, each detected by a single Computed Tomography [CT] examination, searched for any association between their CT appearance and the pathologic diagnosis. In a subgroup of these dogs [n = 7] necropsied within 2 days of the last CT scan, we evaluated whether there was any anatomic correlation between the ring zone and the histopathologic features of the lesions. Our study consisted of eight dogs with primary brain tumors [3 meningiomas, 3 astrocytomas, 1 mixed glioma, 1 oligodendroglioma], 4 with metastatic brain tumors [2 fibrosarcomas, 1 mammary carcinoma, 1 melanoma] and 3 with non‐neoplastic brain lesions [2 intraparenchymal hemorrhages, 1 pyogranulomatous meningoencephalitis]. The overall size and shape of the contrast enhancing CT lesions, as well as the thickness, surface texture and degree of enhancement of the ring were subjectively evaluated. No association was found between the CT lesion characteristics and the pathologic diagnosis. In the sub‐group of dogs euthanatized within 2 days of the CT examination, distinct histologic features which anatomically correlated with the zone of ring enhancement were found in 3 of 7 lesions. The findings of this study are consistent with those of ring‐enhancing lesions in people, and indicates that CT ring enhancement is a non‐specific phenomenon which can occur in a variety of neoplastic and non‐neoplastic lesions in the dog.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)16-20
Number of pages5
JournalVeterinary Radiology & Ultrasound
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

Fingerprint

computed tomography
lesions (animal)
Tomography
Dogs
dogs
brain
Brain Neoplasms
Oligodendroglioma
Meningoencephalitis
Fibrosarcoma
Astrocytoma
Brain
Meningioma
fibrosarcoma
neoplasms
meningoencephalitis
Glioma
melanoma
Melanoma
breast neoplasms

Keywords

  • brain
  • computed tomography
  • dog
  • neuropathology
  • ring enhancement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

INTRACRANIAL RING ENHANCING LESIONS IN DOGS : A CORRELATIVE CT SCANNING AND NEUROPATHOLOGIC STUDY. / Wolf, Michael; Pedroia, Vince; Higgins, Robert; Koblik, Philip D.; Turrel, Jane M.; Owens, Jerry M.

In: Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound, Vol. 36, No. 1, 01.01.1995, p. 16-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wolf, Michael ; Pedroia, Vince ; Higgins, Robert ; Koblik, Philip D. ; Turrel, Jane M. ; Owens, Jerry M. / INTRACRANIAL RING ENHANCING LESIONS IN DOGS : A CORRELATIVE CT SCANNING AND NEUROPATHOLOGIC STUDY. In: Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound. 1995 ; Vol. 36, No. 1. pp. 16-20.
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