Intracranial and systemic effects of osmotic and oncotic therapy in experimental cerebral edema

A. L. Albright, Richard E Latchaw, A. G. Robinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Experiments were carried out to compare the effectiveness of oncotic and osmotic therapy in dogs with experimental cerebral edema caused by a left parietal cold lesion. Animals were divided into five groups and treated for 6 hours with either crystalloid (control group), or mannitol, albumin, furosemide, or albumin/furosemide (treatment groups). The cerebral effects of therapy were evaluated by intracranial pressure (ICP) measurements and by postmortem evaluations of water content, using computerized tomography (CT) density measurements and wet-dry weight measurements. The ICP was significantly reduced by all treatments except albumin alone, and was reduced equally by mannitol, furosemide, and albumin/furosemide. The CT density of the lesion area was significantly increased by all treatments. The density of the contralateral nonlesioned hemisphere was significantly increased by all treatments except albumin. The water content of the lesion area was significantly decreased by all treatments; water content of the opposite hemisphere was not significantly reduced. The systemic effects of therapy were evaluated by measuring the net fluid balance, wedge pressures, hematocrits, free water clearance, and vasopressin. Negative fluid balance without an increase in hematocrit or in vasopressin secretion occurred only in dogs treated with albumin/furosemide. Such oncodiuretic therapy seems to cause normovolemic dehydration and to have cerebral effects similar to mannitol and furosemide, without their undesirable systemic effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)481-489
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery
Volume60
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1984
Externally publishedYes

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Investigational Therapies
Brain Edema
Furosemide
Albumins
Mannitol
Water-Electrolyte Balance
Therapeutics
Water
Intracranial Pressure
Vasopressins
Hematocrit
Tomography
Dogs
Pulmonary Wedge Pressure
Dehydration
Weights and Measures
Control Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Intracranial and systemic effects of osmotic and oncotic therapy in experimental cerebral edema. / Albright, A. L.; Latchaw, Richard E; Robinson, A. G.

In: Journal of Neurosurgery, Vol. 60, No. 3, 1984, p. 481-489.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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