Intoxicated prejudice

The impact of alcohol consumption on implicitly and explicitly measured racial attitudes

Chris Loersch, Bruce D. Bartholow, Mark Manning, Jimmy Calanchini, Jeffrey Sherman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent research has shown that alcohol consumption can exacerbate expressions of racial bias by increasing reliance on stereotypes. However, little work has investigated how alcohol affects intergroup evaluations. The current work sought to address the issue in the context of the correspondence between implicit and explicit measures of anti-Black attitudes. Participants were randomly assigned to consume an alcoholic (target BrAC of 0.08%), placebo, or control beverage prior to completing implicit and explicit measures of racial attitudes. Although beverage condition did not affect prejudice levels on either measure, it did change the correlation between them. Implicitly measured attitudes significantly predicted explicit reports of prejudice and discrimination only for participants who consumed alcohol. We discuss the implications of our findings for debates regarding dissociations between implicit and explicit measures and the cultural phenomenon of intoxicated individuals attributing prejudiced statements to alcohol consumption rather than personal attitudes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)256-268
Number of pages13
JournalGroup Processes and Intergroup Relations
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

alcohol consumption
prejudice
Alcohol Drinking
Alcohols
Beverages
alcohol
Racism
alcoholism
stereotype
discrimination
Placebos
Prejudice
Alcohol
trend
evaluation
Research

Keywords

  • alcohol
  • attitudes
  • implicit measures
  • prejudice
  • race bias

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Cultural Studies
  • Communication
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Intoxicated prejudice : The impact of alcohol consumption on implicitly and explicitly measured racial attitudes. / Loersch, Chris; Bartholow, Bruce D.; Manning, Mark; Calanchini, Jimmy; Sherman, Jeffrey.

In: Group Processes and Intergroup Relations, Vol. 18, No. 2, 01.01.2015, p. 256-268.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Loersch, Chris ; Bartholow, Bruce D. ; Manning, Mark ; Calanchini, Jimmy ; Sherman, Jeffrey. / Intoxicated prejudice : The impact of alcohol consumption on implicitly and explicitly measured racial attitudes. In: Group Processes and Intergroup Relations. 2015 ; Vol. 18, No. 2. pp. 256-268.
@article{bf0996797cc8443aadfb626f85732447,
title = "Intoxicated prejudice: The impact of alcohol consumption on implicitly and explicitly measured racial attitudes",
abstract = "Recent research has shown that alcohol consumption can exacerbate expressions of racial bias by increasing reliance on stereotypes. However, little work has investigated how alcohol affects intergroup evaluations. The current work sought to address the issue in the context of the correspondence between implicit and explicit measures of anti-Black attitudes. Participants were randomly assigned to consume an alcoholic (target BrAC of 0.08{\%}), placebo, or control beverage prior to completing implicit and explicit measures of racial attitudes. Although beverage condition did not affect prejudice levels on either measure, it did change the correlation between them. Implicitly measured attitudes significantly predicted explicit reports of prejudice and discrimination only for participants who consumed alcohol. We discuss the implications of our findings for debates regarding dissociations between implicit and explicit measures and the cultural phenomenon of intoxicated individuals attributing prejudiced statements to alcohol consumption rather than personal attitudes.",
keywords = "alcohol, attitudes, implicit measures, prejudice, race bias",
author = "Chris Loersch and Bartholow, {Bruce D.} and Mark Manning and Jimmy Calanchini and Jeffrey Sherman",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/1368430214561693",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "18",
pages = "256--268",
journal = "Group Processes and Intergroup Relations",
issn = "1368-4302",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Intoxicated prejudice

T2 - The impact of alcohol consumption on implicitly and explicitly measured racial attitudes

AU - Loersch, Chris

AU - Bartholow, Bruce D.

AU - Manning, Mark

AU - Calanchini, Jimmy

AU - Sherman, Jeffrey

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Recent research has shown that alcohol consumption can exacerbate expressions of racial bias by increasing reliance on stereotypes. However, little work has investigated how alcohol affects intergroup evaluations. The current work sought to address the issue in the context of the correspondence between implicit and explicit measures of anti-Black attitudes. Participants were randomly assigned to consume an alcoholic (target BrAC of 0.08%), placebo, or control beverage prior to completing implicit and explicit measures of racial attitudes. Although beverage condition did not affect prejudice levels on either measure, it did change the correlation between them. Implicitly measured attitudes significantly predicted explicit reports of prejudice and discrimination only for participants who consumed alcohol. We discuss the implications of our findings for debates regarding dissociations between implicit and explicit measures and the cultural phenomenon of intoxicated individuals attributing prejudiced statements to alcohol consumption rather than personal attitudes.

AB - Recent research has shown that alcohol consumption can exacerbate expressions of racial bias by increasing reliance on stereotypes. However, little work has investigated how alcohol affects intergroup evaluations. The current work sought to address the issue in the context of the correspondence between implicit and explicit measures of anti-Black attitudes. Participants were randomly assigned to consume an alcoholic (target BrAC of 0.08%), placebo, or control beverage prior to completing implicit and explicit measures of racial attitudes. Although beverage condition did not affect prejudice levels on either measure, it did change the correlation between them. Implicitly measured attitudes significantly predicted explicit reports of prejudice and discrimination only for participants who consumed alcohol. We discuss the implications of our findings for debates regarding dissociations between implicit and explicit measures and the cultural phenomenon of intoxicated individuals attributing prejudiced statements to alcohol consumption rather than personal attitudes.

KW - alcohol

KW - attitudes

KW - implicit measures

KW - prejudice

KW - race bias

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84923348522&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84923348522&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/1368430214561693

DO - 10.1177/1368430214561693

M3 - Article

VL - 18

SP - 256

EP - 268

JO - Group Processes and Intergroup Relations

JF - Group Processes and Intergroup Relations

SN - 1368-4302

IS - 2

ER -