Intestinal obstruction by trichobezoars in five cats

V. R. Barrs, J. A. Beatty, P. L C Tisdall, Geraldine B Hunt, M. Gunew, R. G. Nicoll, R. Malik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Between 1997 and 1999, five domestic crossbred cats (four long haired, one short haired) presented with a palpable abdominal mass and were shown to have small intestinal trichobezoars at laparotomy or necropsy. Hair balls were associated with partial or complete intestinal obstruction and were situated in the proximal jejunum to distal ileum. In four cats obstructions were simple, while the remaining cat had a strangulating obstruction. Three of the cats were 10 years or older, and two were less than 4 years. In the three older cats abdominal neoplasia was suspected and investigations were delayed or declined in two of these cats because of a perceived poor prognosis. Predisposing factors identified in this series of cats included a long-hair coat, flea allergy dermatitis, inflammatory bowel disease and ingestion of non-digestible plant material. This report shows that the ingestion of hair is not always innocuous and that intestinal trichobezoars should be considered in the differential diagnoses of intestinal obstruction and intra-abdominal mass lesions, particularly in long-haired cats.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)199-207
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
Volume1
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

trichobezoars
Bezoars
Intestinal Obstruction
intestinal obstruction
Cats
cats
Hair
trichomes
flea allergy dermatitis
Eating
ingestion
Siphonaptera
inflammatory bowel disease
laparotomy
Dermatitis
Jejunum
jejunum
Ileum
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
ileum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Barrs, V. R., Beatty, J. A., Tisdall, P. L. C., Hunt, G. B., Gunew, M., Nicoll, R. G., & Malik, R. (1999). Intestinal obstruction by trichobezoars in five cats. Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, 1(4), 199-207. https://doi.org/10.1053/jfms.1999.0042

Intestinal obstruction by trichobezoars in five cats. / Barrs, V. R.; Beatty, J. A.; Tisdall, P. L C; Hunt, Geraldine B; Gunew, M.; Nicoll, R. G.; Malik, R.

In: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Vol. 1, No. 4, 12.1999, p. 199-207.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Barrs, VR, Beatty, JA, Tisdall, PLC, Hunt, GB, Gunew, M, Nicoll, RG & Malik, R 1999, 'Intestinal obstruction by trichobezoars in five cats', Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, vol. 1, no. 4, pp. 199-207. https://doi.org/10.1053/jfms.1999.0042
Barrs, V. R. ; Beatty, J. A. ; Tisdall, P. L C ; Hunt, Geraldine B ; Gunew, M. ; Nicoll, R. G. ; Malik, R. / Intestinal obstruction by trichobezoars in five cats. In: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery. 1999 ; Vol. 1, No. 4. pp. 199-207.
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