Interventions that facilitate socialization in children with autism

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

278 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Social dysfunction is perhaps the most defining and handicapping feature of autism. Improved social functioning has long been considered one of the most important intervention outcomes. A variety of social interventions have been designed, empirically examined, and published in the autism literature. Children with autism have been found to be responsive to a wide variety of interventions aimed at increasing their social engagement with others, both adults and peers. Successful strategies employing peer-mediated approaches and peer tutoring have involved typically developing peers. Furthermore, several studies have demonstrated that social engagement directly affects other important behaviors like language, even these behaviors are not specifically targeted by the teaching program. Thus, while an area of severe involvement, social behavior is also responsive to intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)399-409
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Volume30
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Socialization
Autistic Disorder
Social Behavior
Teaching
Language

Keywords

  • Autism
  • Social dysfunction
  • Social interventions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Interventions that facilitate socialization in children with autism. / Rogers, Sally J.

In: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, Vol. 30, No. 5, 2000, p. 399-409.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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