Intact retinal tissue and retinal pigment epithelium identified within a coloboma by high-speed, ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography

Christopher H. Judson, Laurel N. Vuong, Iwona Gorczynska, Vivek Srinivasan, James G. Fujimoto, Jay S. Duker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to report on a posterior segment coloboma manifesting unusual morphology as determined by high-speed, ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography imaging. Methods: A 47-year-old woman with bilateral colobomas was evaluated by fundus examination and high-speed, ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography imaging. Results: Imaging with high-speed, ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography showed intact retinal pigment epithelium within the posterior segment coloboma. Most of the retinal layers seemed to continue into the coloboma, although they exhibited slight attenuation. The external limiting membrane was clearly visible continuing within the coloboma, suggesting that Mü ller cells and the inner segments of the photoreceptors were still present in this area. The junction between the inner and outer segments of the photoreceptors ended at the margin of the coloboma, which may be because of either photoreceptor disruption or a change in the orientation of the outer segments. Conclusion: High-speed, ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography imaging showed the presence of Mü ller cells and photoreceptor inner segments within a posterior segment coloboma. The retinal pigment epithelium was intact within the coloboma, representing an unusual morphology. copyright

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)46-48
Number of pages3
JournalRetinal Cases and Brief Reports
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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